Beliefs of experienced and student teachers about the nature and purpose of social studies education in New Zealand elementary schools.

ResearchSpace Repository

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Hawe, EM en
dc.contributor.author Browne, Isabel en
dc.contributor.author Siteine, Alexis en
dc.contributor.author Tuck, Bryan en
dc.date.accessioned 2012-02-09T01:57:12Z en
dc.date.issued 2010 en
dc.identifier.citation Asia Pacific Journal of Education 30(3):289-304 2010 en
dc.identifier.issn 0218-8791 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/11022 en
dc.description.abstract This paper reports on an investigation carried out in New Zealand into experienced elementary and student teachers, beliefs about the nature and purpose of social studies education. Since its inclusion in New Zealand,s curriculum, social studies has been organized around the notion of citizenship education with curricula and programmes of work influenced by four overarching "traditions"-social studies as: citizenship transmission; social science; reflective inquiry; and personal, social and ethical empowerment. A 20-item scale based on these traditions was administered to 228 student teachers and 64 experienced teachers. A factor analysis indicated that participants, perceptions of the dimensions of social studies education were, with one exception, reasonably close to the four traditions. Despite the contested nature of social studies, the student and experienced teachers held similar positions on the relative importance of the traditions and dimensions. It is argued that this agreement arises, wholly or in part, from their common "apprenticeship of experience" in classrooms, the broader socio-historical context in which their beliefs were developed, the widespread influence of a prevalent educational discourse, and a shared lack of experience in formal knowledge associated with specific social science disciplines. It was concluded that the uncomfortable generational encounters often reported in the literature between novice and experienced teachers are unlikely to occur in relation to the teaching of elementary social studies in New Zealand. en
dc.publisher National Institute of Education, Singapore en
dc.relation.ispartofseries Asia Pacific Journal of Education en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Details obtained from http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/issn/0218-8791/ en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.title Beliefs of experienced and student teachers about the nature and purpose of social studies education in New Zealand elementary schools. en
dc.type Journal Article en
dc.identifier.doi 10.1080/02188791.2010.495842 en
pubs.issue 3 en
pubs.begin-page 289 en
pubs.volume 30 en
dc.rights.holder Copyright: National Institute of Education, Singapore en
pubs.end-page 304 en
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/RestrictedAccess en
pubs.subtype Article en
pubs.elements-id 87335 en
pubs.org-id Education and Social Work en
pubs.org-id Critical Studies in Education en
pubs.org-id Learning Development and Professional Practice en
pubs.record-created-at-source-date 2010-09-01 en


Files in this item

There are no files associated with this item.

Find Full text

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Share

Search ResearchSpace


Advanced Search

Browse

Statistics