Selection for chemical trait remixing in an invasive weed after reassociation with a coevolved specialist

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dc.contributor.author Zangerl, AR en
dc.contributor.author Stanley, Margaret en
dc.contributor.author Berenbaum, MR en
dc.date.accessioned 2012-03-01T02:01:08Z en
dc.date.issued 2008 en
dc.identifier.citation Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 105(12):4547-4552 2008 en
dc.identifier.issn 0027-8424 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/12404 en
dc.description.abstract The interaction between Depressaria pastinacella (parsnip webworm) and wild parsnip (Pastinaca sativa), in its native Europe and in its longstanding nonindigenous range in the midwestern United States, is characterized by chemical phenotype matching, ostensibly mediated by reciprocal selective responses. The first appearance of D. pastinacella on P. sativa in New Zealand in 2004 provided an opportunity to quantify selective impacts of a coevolved herbivore and calibrate rates of phytochemical response in its host plant. Webworms in 2006 reduced seed production up to 75% in New Zealand populations, and in 2007 infestations increased in severity in all populations except one. Most New Zealand populations fall into a furanocoumarin phenotype cluster distinct from European and U.S. phenotypes, although one heavily attacked population clusters with two U.S. populations and one European population long associated with webworms. Multivariate selection analysis substituting realized fitness (with webworms present) for potential fitness (absent webworms) as the dependent variable revealed that reassociation with a coevolved specialist in a nonindigenous area profoundly altered the selection regime, favoring trait remixing and rapid chemical changes in parsnip populations, as predicted by the geographic mosaic theory. That uninfested populations of New Zealand parsnips contain higher amounts of octyl acetate, a floral volatile used by webworms for orientation, suggests that plants that escape from specialized enemies may also experience selection to increase kairomones, as well as to reduce allomones. en
dc.publisher National Academy of Sciences en
dc.relation.ispartofseries Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Details obtained from: http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/issn/1091-6490/ en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.title Selection for chemical trait remixing in an invasive weed after reassociation with a coevolved specialist en
dc.type Journal Article en
dc.identifier.doi 10.1073/pnas.0710280105 en
pubs.issue 12 en
pubs.begin-page 4547 en
pubs.volume 105 en
dc.rights.holder Copyright: National Academy of Sciences en
dc.identifier.pmid 18238901 en
pubs.end-page 4552 en
pubs.publication-status Published en
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/RestrictedAccess en
pubs.subtype Article en
pubs.elements-id 82058 en
pubs.org-id Science en
pubs.org-id Biological Sciences en
pubs.record-created-at-source-date 2010-09-01 en
pubs.dimensions-id 18238901 en


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