An indigenous perspective on water recycling

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dc.contributor.author Morgan, Te Kipa en
dc.date.accessioned 2012-03-08T02:53:08Z en
dc.date.issued 2006 en
dc.identifier.citation Desalination 187:127-136 2006 en
dc.identifier.issn 0011-9164 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/13444 en
dc.description.abstract The Maori people have always valued water as a taonga*. Waitangi Tribunal* reports from the previous twenty years demonstrate this. In these reports it is concluded that the rivers and tributaries within the rohe* of the hapu* claimant groups were and are taonga of the Tangata Whenua*. Water and water bodies such as rivers, lakes and wetlands, have their own mauri*, which it is important for the Tangata Whenua to protect from pollution, degradation and damage. Rivers, lakes and wetlands are also key elements in the identity, whakapapa* and mana* of the hapu. In order to include indigenous perspectives appropriately in infrastructure evaluation and decision-making the Mauri Model has been created. Mauri is the central concept that this evaluation model uses to identify the Tangata Whenua perceptions of the sustainability of various techniques under consideration for proposed infrastructure development. The Mauri Model has a strong foundation in traditional Tangata Whenua values and also parallels the current policy direction being taken by Central Government in New Zealand. This enables a direct comparison between the results of a conventional analysis of techniques available and the results based on analysis of impacts on mauri within the Mauri Model. Research presented in this paper identified significant differences with regard to the appropriate use of recycled water, in particular wastewater. Recycling is a concept recognised by the Tangata Whenua; however, the integrity of the mauri in recycled water greatly influences how it can be used. Further, recycling some of these waters in a culturally consistent manner could only be achieved by returning the water to the ground or onto land. en
dc.publisher Elsevier en
dc.relation.ispartofseries Desalination en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Details obtained from http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/issn/0011-9164/ en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.title An indigenous perspective on water recycling en
dc.type Journal Article en
dc.identifier.doi 10.1016/j.desal.2005.04.073 en
pubs.begin-page 127 en
pubs.volume 187 en
dc.rights.holder Copyright: Elsevier en
pubs.end-page 136 en
pubs.publication-status Published en
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/RestrictedAccess en
pubs.subtype Article en
pubs.elements-id 89729 en
pubs.record-created-at-source-date 2010-09-01 en


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