Perspectives on adherence to blood pressure– lowering medications among samoan patients: qualitative interviews

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dc.contributor.author Chang Wai, K en
dc.contributor.author Elley, Carolyn en
dc.contributor.author Nosa, Vili en
dc.contributor.author Kennelly, John en
dc.contributor.author Mabotuwana, T en
dc.contributor.author Warren, James en
dc.date.accessioned 2012-04-11T05:14:45Z en
dc.date.issued 2010 en
dc.identifier.citation Journal of Primary Health Care 2(3):217-224 2010 en
dc.identifier.issn 1172-6156 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/17038 en
dc.description.abstract AIM: To explore influences on adherence to taking long-term medications among samoan patients in an Auckland general practice. METHODs: Twenty samoan participants from an Auckland general practice were identified and interviewed about their views on adherence or non-adherence to taking blood pressure–lowering medications. One-to-one semi-structured interviews using open-ended questions were undertaken in samoan and English, recorded, transcribed and translated into English. Transcriptions were examined by two researchers to identify themes. FInDInGs: Patients with ‘high’ and ‘lower’ rates of adherence to taking usual medication were identified using medication possession ratio cut-offs from medical records of timely prescribing. Ten participants with ‘high’ and 10 with ‘lower’ rates of adherence were interviewed, including 11 women and nine men. Themes identified for those with lower adherence included ‘lack of transport’, ‘family commitments’, ‘forgetfulness’, ‘church activities’, ‘feeling well’ and ‘priorities’. Themes identified for those with high rates of adherence included ‘prioritising health’, ‘previous event’, ‘time management’, ‘supportive family members’ and ‘relationship with GP (language and trust)’. A theme common to both was ‘coping with the stress of multiple comorbidities’. COnCLUsIOn: Reasons for adherence and non-adherence to taking blood pressure–lowering medications among the samoan patients interviewed were multifactorial and encompass personal, social, cultural and environmental factors. interdisciplinary teams to support treatment decisions (including Pacific health professionals or community health workers), systematic identification of those with low rates of adherence, phone or text follow-up, use of church or family networks, provision of transport where needed and better tools and resources may help address this problem. KEYWORDs: Medication adherence; new Zealand; Pacific islands; ethnic groups; qualitative research; antihypertensive agents en
dc.publisher The Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners en
dc.relation.ispartofseries Journal of Primary Health Care en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.title Perspectives on adherence to blood pressure– lowering medications among samoan patients: qualitative interviews en
dc.type Journal Article en
pubs.issue 3 en
pubs.begin-page 217 en
pubs.volume 2 en
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners en
dc.identifier.pmid 21069117 en
pubs.author-url http://www.rnzcgp.org.nz/september-2010/ en
pubs.end-page 224 en
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/RestrictedAccess en
pubs.subtype Article en
pubs.elements-id 182789 en
pubs.org-id Medical and Health Sciences en
pubs.org-id Population Health en
pubs.org-id Gen.Practice& Primary Hlthcare en
pubs.org-id Pacific Health en
pubs.org-id Science en
pubs.org-id School of Computer Science en
pubs.record-created-at-source-date 2010-11-23 en
pubs.dimensions-id 21069117 en


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