The Influence of Complexity and Ambiguity upon Decision Making in Emergency Response: A case study of the New Zealand Ministry of Civil Defence and Emergency Management

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dc.contributor.advisor Erakovic, L en
dc.contributor.author Clements, Samuel en
dc.date.accessioned 2013-01-15T00:25:23Z en
dc.date.issued 2012 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/19885 en
dc.description Full text is available to authenticated members of The University of Auckland only. en
dc.description.abstract Disasters of the natural, human caused, and hybrid variety, have increased exponentially in recent decades. The manner in which emergency response organisations respond to these events, is of significant importance in determining the rate and speed of recovery of affected communities and individuals. Quality decision making is integral to efficient and professional response, and is vital to ensuring the successful distribution of relief resources, the effective targeting of assistance, the assessment of needs, and in the coordination of both intra and inter-agency response efforts. The research sought to examine the manner in which issues of complexity and ambiguity might influence the decision making process. This thesis explores these issues through a case study analysis of agency work within the New Zealand Ministry of Civil Defence and Emergency Management, (MCDEM). On a secondary level, the research examines the varying degrees to which the rational, boundedly rational, and garbage can models of decision making, influence decision making within the emergency environment. The findings show that issues surrounding organisational structure and legislative guidelines, communication, inter-agency response coordination, resourcing, and political interference, contribute varying degrees of complexity and ambiguity towards such decision making processes and procedures. These factors were particularly evident in relation to MCDEM’s response efforts in the aftermath of the magnitude 6.3 Christchurch earthquake of February 2011. In addition, the findings demonstrate that the boundedly rational, and garbage can models of decision making, were most applicable to this case study analysis of emergency response. en
dc.publisher ResearchSpace@Auckland en
dc.relation.ispartof Masters Thesis - University of Auckland en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. en
dc.rights Restricted Item. Available to authenticated members of The University of Auckland. en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/nz/ en
dc.title The Influence of Complexity and Ambiguity upon Decision Making in Emergency Response: A case study of the New Zealand Ministry of Civil Defence and Emergency Management en
dc.type Thesis en
thesis.degree.grantor The University of Auckland en
thesis.degree.level Masters en
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The Author en
pubs.author-url http://hdl.handle.net/2292/19885 en
pubs.elements-id 371508 en
pubs.record-created-at-source-date 2013-01-15 en


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