The Effect of Written Corrective Feedback and Revision on Intermediate Chinese Learners' Acquisition of English

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dc.contributor.advisor Ellis, R en
dc.contributor.author Frear, David en
dc.date.accessioned 2013-02-14T21:08:45Z en
dc.date.issued 2012 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/20005 en
dc.description.abstract The study reported in this thesis builds on the research of Ellis, Sheen, Murakami and Takashima (2008) by investigating the effectiveness of corrective feedback (CF) in terms of its focus and directness. It also examines the effectiveness of CF with and without opportunities for revision. As such, the research allows for an inspection of theoretical claims made by Truscott (1996) and Ferris (1999). The research was undertaken in a Taiwanese university context. Adopting a quasiexperimental and step-up design, intact classes were assigned to the following four CF treatment groups: Focused Direct CF, Unfocused Direct CF, Focused Indirect CF, Unfocused Indirect CF. A Control Group received no CF. The effects of the CF on two grammatical structures, English regular verbs forms and irregular verb forms, were investigated. The participants were required to complete five narrative writing tasks and a revision task over a seven week period with corrections provided on two tasks. The design of the study allowed for an analysis of the effectiveness of CF on new pieces of writing, the effectiveness of CF on a revised version of a text and the effectiveness of a combination of CF and revision on new pieces of writing. The results demonstrated that there were improvements in accuracy in new pieces of writing for the regular past tense. However, there were none for the irregular past tense. A single episode of CF led to short-term improvements for all four CF groups; however, only the Focused Direct CF Group showed continued improvements in the long-term (i.e. in a piece of writing completed two weeks later). The accuracy of the learners in the other three CF groups atrophied over the same period. There were no improvements in accuracy for the Control Group. There were also group differences evident in the long-term. The combined focused CF groups outperformed both the unfocused CF groups and the Control Group. The CF groups improved in accuracy in the use of both structures in the revised version of their text. There were also group differences evident. The combined direct groups produced more accurate revisions of both structures than the combined indirect groups and the Control Groups. The investigation of the effectiveness of CF plus revision on new pieces of writing found improvements over time for the regular past tense but none for the irregular past tense. There were short-term improvements in accuracy for the Focused Direct CF Group and the Unfocused Direct CF Group. Both these groups in fact continued to improve in the long-term. There were no improvements over time in the Control Group. In the long-term, the combined direct CF groups outperformed the indirect CF ones. The findings provide evidence to refute Truscott’s (1996) claim that CF has no effect on accuracy in new pieces of writing. However, this was only clearly evident for Focused Direct CF and only for the regular past tense. The study failed to support Truscott’s assertion that writing practice alone can lead to improved accuracy. Ferris’ (1999) argument that some error types are treatable while others are untreatable was supported by the results of the study; only the regular past tense benefited from CF. en
dc.publisher ResearchSpace@Auckland en
dc.relation.ispartof PhD Thesis - University of Auckland en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/nz/ en
dc.title The Effect of Written Corrective Feedback and Revision on Intermediate Chinese Learners' Acquisition of English en
dc.type Thesis en
thesis.degree.grantor The University of Auckland en
thesis.degree.level Doctoral en
thesis.degree.name PhD en
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The Author en
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/OpenAccess en
pubs.elements-id 373154 en
pubs.record-created-at-source-date 2013-02-15 en


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