Insulating Concrete Formwork (ICF) and Concrete: An Alternative Construction Approach For Sustainable And Resilient Architecture. A Christchurch-Centric Study For Post-Disaster Residential Design And Construction.

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dc.contributor.advisor Birkeland, J en
dc.contributor.author Chant, Martin en
dc.date.accessioned 2013-03-06T23:09:56Z en
dc.date.issued 2012 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/20164 en
dc.description Full text is available to authenticated members of The University of Auckland only. en
dc.description.abstract The Christchurch, New Zealand earthquake events of 2010-2011 were unprecedented, unexpected, and caused significant damage to the local residential building stock. The extent of damage was largely due to shaking and ground failure, in addition to inadequate design and construction of existing housing to resist the forces of the magnitude presented. The earthquake events provided an opportunity to reflect on aspects of the existing built environment and how best to move forward in the creation of a sustainable and resilient built environment for the future. Built-in resilience is currently of interest in built environment discourse and is argued as a necessary factor for sustainable building construction and development to be realised. Sustainable design principles and practices are now accepted as a necessity for future building and setting a legacy for future generations. This research examined the Christchurch earthquake events, failures of residential structures and the suitability of traditional timber frame construction methods and the existing building stock. The research investigated a sampling of sustainability theories and schools of thought to seek an intellectual framework as a basis for the design, materials selection and methods for building future housing. This research also explored the materials, components and industries associated with Insulating Concrete Formwork (ICF) and concrete construction methods and their potential within a comprehensive system in response to the post-disaster context. A comparison of the proposed ICF system performance against traditional timber frame based construction was undertaken to evaluate its potential as a comprehensive alternative solution for post-earthquake reconstruction of housing. Development of a representative building model based on the research revealed that a number of specific attributes existed that offered a different perspective as to how high-performing residential buildings can be designed and built. The research identified ICF as a key facilitating component that can introduce industrial concrete construction methods and efficiencies to the residential arena, but within a sustainability, resilience and sustainable construction paradigm. The outcome of the research reveals that ICF and concrete construction can deliver a viable alternative, resilient and potentially sustainable housing solution for post-disaster housing, and housing in general designed to last for future generations. en
dc.publisher ResearchSpace@Auckland en
dc.relation.ispartof Masters Thesis - University of Auckland en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. en
dc.rights Restricted Item. Available to authenticated members of The University of Auckland. en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.title Insulating Concrete Formwork (ICF) and Concrete: An Alternative Construction Approach For Sustainable And Resilient Architecture. A Christchurch-Centric Study For Post-Disaster Residential Design And Construction. en
dc.type Thesis en
thesis.degree.grantor The University of Auckland en
thesis.degree.level Masters en
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The Author en
pubs.elements-id 374186 en
pubs.record-created-at-source-date 2013-03-07 en


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