Life after death on Facebook: Memorials and last wishes

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dc.contributor.advisor Owens, G en
dc.contributor.author Zhang, Deww en
dc.date.accessioned 2013-08-13T20:15:59Z en
dc.date.issued 2013 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/20692 en
dc.description Full text is available to authenticated members of The University of Auckland only. en
dc.description.abstract As more people are using social networking sites like Facebook to document their lives and keep in touch with others, it is becoming increasingly important to consider what will happen to their digital assets that they will have amassed over the years before they die. But are Facebook users aware of what will happen to their accounts when they die? What do Facebook users think about Facebook‟s memorialising policy, which outlines how deceased user‟s accounts are handled? And are Facebook‟s policies and procedures congruent with what people want to have happen to their Facebook accounts when they die? 113 people completed an online survey to answer these questions. The questionnaire found that while most participants were not aware of and did not have any personal experiences with Facebook‟s memorialising policy, they were generally able to guess what might happen to their accounts when they die. When given a summary of Facebook‟s memorialising policy, participants‟ responses were mostly positive, though notably 60% of participants did not want their accounts memorialised when they die. Many were able to highlight advantages and disadvantages of memorialising a deceased user‟s account, and two suggestions were offered to Facebook to better accommodate its population of deceased users and their loved ones. Participants were most comfortable sharing aspects of their Facebook account with their close friends, though privacy is considered to be as important in death as it is in life. Additionally, though the majority of the participants had not considered what would happen to their Facebook accounts when they die before attempting the survey, almost 30% of the participants indicated they would proceed to make some provisions for their Facebook account in the event of their deaths after having completed the survey. Keywords: bereavement, continuing bonds, digital assets, Facebook, grief, online memorials, social networking sites, thanatechnology, thanatology, thanatosensitivity en
dc.publisher ResearchSpace@Auckland en
dc.relation.ispartof Masters Thesis - University of Auckland en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. en
dc.rights Restricted Item. Available to authenticated members of The University of Auckland. en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/nz/ en
dc.title Life after death on Facebook: Memorials and last wishes en
dc.type Thesis en
thesis.degree.grantor The University of Auckland en
thesis.degree.level Masters en
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The Author en
pubs.author-url http://hdl.handle.net/2292/20692 en
pubs.elements-id 405396 en
pubs.record-created-at-source-date 2013-08-14 en


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