Pain and Analgesia in Advanced Age Epidemiology and Pharmacoepidemiology

ResearchSpace/Manakin Repository

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Kerse, N en
dc.contributor.advisor Teh, R en
dc.contributor.author Allen, Katrina en
dc.date.accessioned 2013-11-12T02:56:03Z en
dc.date.issued 2013 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/21084 en
dc.description Full text is available to authenticated members of The University of Auckland only. en
dc.description.abstract People of advanced age are an increasing proportion of the population of New Zealand and other developed countries. Pain has a significant impact on quality of life. Pain and related analgesic use are not well researched in this very elderly population. Epidemiological data is needed to enable further understanding of the scope and relationships of this area. Improved outcomes and health planning may result from studies in this field. Aims: To describe the epidemiology of pain in those of advanced age in New Zealand; in both Māori and non-Māori. To describe the epidemiology of analgesic medications used by those of advanced age in New Zealand; in both Māori and non-Māori. Method: Data collected from 657 people aged 80-90 years living in Bay of Plenty region were analysed with respect to pain prevalence and characteristics. Possible determinants including socio-demographic and physical factors were analysed statistically for associations. Analgesic use and associated factors for the 657 people was also explored. Findings: The monthly prevalence of any pain was 56%. The prevalence of more significant pain was 30%. Prevalence rates and pain characteristics were similar for both ethnic groups. The commonest sites of pain were back/neck and lower limb. Females reported more pain than males. For non-Māori pain was reported by 64% of females and 50% of males. For Māori 62% of females and 41% of males reported pain. Strong associations with pain were found for arthritis and osteoporosis for both ethnic groups and pain was associated with lower quality of life measures. Pain was associated with depression and increasing BMI in non-Māori but not in Māori. Diabetes and socio-economic position were. not associated with pain for either ethnic group. Analgesic medications were used 42% of people with pain. Analgesic use was higher in non-Māori (47%) than in Māori (35%). The most commonly used analgesic was paracetamol. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and opiates were used infrequently by both ethnic groups. Glucosamine was used by 11% of non-Māori with pain; usage was uncommon in Māori. The use of non-prescription analgesics was low comprising 3-6% of total analgesic use. Conclusions: Pain is common in those of advanced age and has an impact on quality of life. Pain is more common in very elderly females than in males. There are ethnic differences in factors associated with pain. Less than half of those who reported pain used analgesics. There are ethnic differences in analgesic use patterns. Non-prescribed medication use is low. en
dc.publisher ResearchSpace@Auckland en
dc.relation.ispartof Masters Thesis - University of Auckland en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. en
dc.rights Restricted Item. Available to authenticated members of The University of Auckland. en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/nz/ en
dc.title Pain and Analgesia in Advanced Age Epidemiology and Pharmacoepidemiology en
dc.type Thesis en
thesis.degree.grantor The University of Auckland en
thesis.degree.level Masters en
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The Author en
pubs.elements-id 408708 en
pubs.record-created-at-source-date 2013-11-12 en


Full text options

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/nz/ Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/nz/

Share

Search ResearchSpace


Advanced Search

Browse