Sophistry and philosophy: Two approaches to teaching learning

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dc.contributor.author Sturm, Sean en
dc.date.accessioned 2014-05-21T00:03:15Z en
dc.date.accessioned 2014-06-05T04:21:11Z en
dc.date.accessioned 2014-06-05T04:22:44Z en
dc.date.accessioned 2014-06-05T04:25:10Z en
dc.date.issued 2013 en
dc.identifier.citation TeorÍa de la Educación. Educación y Cultura en la Sociedad de la Información, 2013, 14 (3), pp. 25 - 36 (12) en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/22203 en
dc.description.abstract As university teachers, are we heirs to the Sophists or to Socrates the philoso- pher? Do we teach students institutional know-how like academic ethics and strategies like writing and study skills, which offer shortcuts to institutional competence, or do we draw forth knowledge from students, eliciting wisdom from them and developing what the Greeks called ethos (character) and fidelity to a way of thinking? In short, do we teach a skill or a good? The first approach is sophistical (after the Greek teachers of rhetoric, the Sophists), and seeks to produce efficient knowledge-workers. The second approach is Socratic, or philosophical (after the Greek teacher of philosophy, Socrates), and seeks to produce good citizens. As these ancient names and terms suggest, this is a problem with a long history, but it is one with a local and contemporary resonance, in terms of the state of tertiary education both in Aotearoa/New Zealand, where I live and teach, and at this historical juncture. My question here is how we university teachers might negotiate this binary: how we might bridge these two positions and thereby perhaps transcend them. en
dc.language English en
dc.relation.ispartofseries TeorÍa de la Educación. Educación y Cultura en la Sociedad de la Información en
dc.relation.replaces http://hdl.handle.net/2292/22130 en
dc.relation.replaces 2292/22130 en
dc.relation.replaces http://hdl.handle.net/2292/22201 en
dc.relation.replaces 2292/22201 en
dc.relation.replaces http://hdl.handle.net/2292/22202 en
dc.relation.replaces 2292/22202 en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Details obtained from http://campus.usal.es/~revistas_trabajo/index.php/revistatesi/about/editorialPolicies#openAccessPolicy en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ en
dc.subject Sophists en
dc.subject Socrates en
dc.subject maieutics en
dc.subject transformational learning en
dc.subject assessment en
dc.subject growth mindset en
dc.title Sophistry and philosophy: Two approaches to teaching learning en
dc.type Journal Article en
pubs.issue 3 en
pubs.begin-page 25 en
pubs.volume 14 en
dc.description.version VoR - Version of Record en
pubs.author-url http://revistas.usal.es/index.php/revistatesi/article/view/11349 en
pubs.end-page 36 en
pubs.publication-status Published en
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/OpenAccess en
pubs.subtype Article en
pubs.elements-id 434953 en
pubs.org-id Education and Social Work en
pubs.org-id Critical Studies in Education en
dc.identifier.eissn 1138-9737 en
pubs.record-created-at-source-date 2014-04-15 en


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