Gendered Resistance: A Comparative Study of Four Twentieth-Century Women’s Autobiographies

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dc.contributor.advisor Dr Joanne Wilkes en
dc.contributor.advisor Dr Bridget Orr en
dc.contributor.author Baisnée, Valérie en
dc.date.accessioned 2008-01-07T02:48:12Z en
dc.date.available 2008-01-07T02:48:12Z en
dc.date.issued 1994 en
dc.identifier.citation Thesis (PhD--English)--University of Auckland, 1994. en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/2282 en
dc.description Restricted Item. Print thesis available in the University of Auckland Library or may be available through Interlibrary Loan. en
dc.description.abstract This thesis examines comparatively the first parts of four twentieth-century women's autobiographies that have never been studied together: Simone de Beauvoir's Memoires d' une jeune fille rangdee (1958), Maya Angelou's I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings (1969), Janet Frame's To the Is-Land (1982) and Marguerite Duras's L'Amant (1984). Its aim is to show how these women resisted or subverted the established order in their childhood and adolescence and how, through their autobiographical practice, they challenge some assumptions about women's creativity. For this purpose, this study involves a discussion of the reception of each autobiograph, a close analysis of their narrative techniques, and an examination of the institutions in which each protagonist grew up, mainly family, school and/or church. Among these institutions, I emphasise the role of interpersonal relationships within the family, and in particular the mother/daughter relationship. This thesis draws attention to various strategies used by these women to resist subjection: through their bodies, through language, or simply through an escape from the institution, with three of these protagonists choosing to grow up in the street rather than in the family or in the school. Similarly, the way the presence of the narrator is established in the text challenges the reader's perception of the woman writer. I conclude that for these women, the search for identity is not a search for a role or a position but for a place, though they find it in the margins of society. en
dc.format Scanned from print thesis en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher ResearchSpace@Auckland en
dc.relation English en
dc.relation.ispartof PhD Thesis - University of Auckland en
dc.relation.isreferencedby UoA575258 en
dc.rights Whole document restricted. Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.title Gendered Resistance: A Comparative Study of Four Twentieth-Century Women’s Autobiographies en
dc.type Thesis en
thesis.degree.discipline English en
thesis.degree.grantor The University of Auckland en
thesis.degree.level Doctoral en
thesis.degree.name PhD en
dc.subject.marsden Fields of Research::420000 Language and Culture::420100 Language Studies::420101 English en
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The author en
pubs.local.anzsrc 200302 - English Language en
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/ClosedAccess en
pubs.org-id Faculty of Arts en


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