Patellar maltracking is prevalent among patellofemoral pain subjects with patella alta: an upright, weightbearing MRI study.

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dc.contributor.author Pal, S en
dc.contributor.author Besier, Thor en
dc.contributor.author Beaupre, GS en
dc.contributor.author Fredericson, M en
dc.contributor.author Delp, SL en
dc.contributor.author Gold, GE en
dc.date.accessioned 2014-10-01T03:35:29Z en
dc.date.issued 2013-03 en
dc.identifier.citation Journal of Orthopaedic Research, 2013, 31 (3), pp. 448 - 457 en
dc.identifier.issn 0736-0266 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/23070 en
dc.description.abstract The purpose of this study is to determine if patellar maltracking is more prevalent among patellofemoral (PF) pain subjects with patella alta compared to subjects with normal patella height. We imaged 37 PF pain and 15 pain free subjects in an open-configuration magnetic resonance imaging scanner while they stood in a weightbearing posture. We measured patella height using the Caton-Deschamps, Blackburne-Peel, Insall-Salvati, Modified Insall-Salvati, and Patellotrochlear indices, and classified the subjects into patella alta and normal patella height groups. We measured patella tilt and bisect offset from oblique-axial plane images, and classified the subjects into maltracking and normal tracking groups. Patellar maltracking was more prevalent among PF pain subjects with patella alta compared to PF pain subjects with normal patella height (two-tailed Fisher's exact test, p<0.050). Using the Caton-Deschamps index, 67% (8/12) of PF pain subjects with patella alta were maltrackers, whereas only 16% (4/25) of PF pain subjects with normal patella height were maltrackers. Patellofemoral pain subjects classified as maltrackers displayed a greater patella height compared to the pain free and PF pain subjects classified as normal trackers (two-tailed unpaired t-tests with Bonferroni correction, p<0.017). This study adds to our understanding of PF pain in two ways-(1) we demonstrate that patellar maltracking is more prevalent in PF pain subjects with patella alta compared to subjects with normal patella height; and (2) we show greater patella height in PF pain subjects compared to pain free subjects using four indices commonly used in clinics. en
dc.format.medium Print-Electronic en
dc.language eng en
dc.publisher Wiley-Blackwell en
dc.relation.ispartofseries Journal of Orthopaedic Research en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Details obtained from http://olabout.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Section/id-820227.html http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/issn/0736-0266/ en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.subject Patella en
dc.subject Knee Joint en
dc.subject Humans en
dc.subject Arthralgia en
dc.subject Magnetic Resonance Imaging en
dc.subject Prevalence en
dc.subject Posture en
dc.subject Weight-Bearing en
dc.subject Adult en
dc.subject Female en
dc.subject Male en
dc.subject Young Adult en
dc.subject Biomechanical Phenomena en
dc.title Patellar maltracking is prevalent among patellofemoral pain subjects with patella alta: an upright, weightbearing MRI study. en
dc.type Journal Article en
dc.identifier.doi 10.1002/jor.22256 en
pubs.issue 3 en
pubs.begin-page 448 en
pubs.volume 31 en
dc.description.version AM - Accepted Manuscript en
dc.rights.holder Copyright: Wiley-Blackwell en
dc.identifier.pmid 23165335 en
pubs.end-page 457 en
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/RestrictedAccess en
pubs.subtype Article en
pubs.elements-id 364374 en
pubs.org-id Bioengineering Institute en
pubs.org-id ABI Associates en
dc.identifier.eissn 1554-527X en
pubs.record-created-at-source-date 2014-10-01 en
pubs.dimensions-id 23165335 en


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