Do delayed prescriptions reduce the use of antibiotics for the common cold? A single-blind controlled trial!

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dc.contributor.author Arroll, Bruce en
dc.contributor.author Kenealy, Timothy en
dc.contributor.author Kerse, Ngaire en
dc.date.accessioned 2014-10-17T01:22:28Z en
dc.date.issued 2002-04 en
dc.identifier.citation Journal of Family Practice, 2002, 51 (4), pp. 324 - 328 en
dc.identifier.issn 0094-3509 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/23255 en
dc.description.abstract OBJECTIVE: To test the use of a delayed prescription compared with instructions to take antibiotics immediately in patients presenting to family physicians with upper respiratory tract infections (common colds). STUDY DESIGN: Randomized controlled single-blind study. POPULATION: Subjects were 129 patients presenting with the common cold who requested antibiotics or whose physicians thought they wanted them. All patients were in a family practice in Auckland, New Zealand, consisting of 15 physicians (9 male, 6 female) who had completed medical school between 1973 and 1992. OUTCOMES MEASURED: Outcomes were antibiotic use (taking at least 1 dose of the antibiotic), symptom scores, and responses to the satisfaction questions asked at the end of the study. RESULTS: Patients in the delayed-prescription group were less likely to use antibiotics (48%, 95% CI, 35%-60%) than were those instructed to take antibiotics immediately (89%, 95% CI, 76%-94%). Daily body temperature was higher in the immediate-prescription group. The lack of difference in the symptom score between the 2 groups suggests that there is no danger in delaying antibiotic prescriptions for the common cold. CONCLUSIONS: Delayed prescriptions are a safe and effective means of reducing antibiotic consumption in patients with the common cold. Clarification of patient expectations for antibiotics may result in a lower prescription rate. When the patient demands a prescription, delaying its delivery has the potential to provide gentle education. en
dc.relation.ispartofseries Journal of Family Practice en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Details obtained from http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/issn/0094-3509/ en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.title Do delayed prescriptions reduce the use of antibiotics for the common cold? A single-blind controlled trial! en
dc.type Journal Article en
pubs.issue 4 en
pubs.begin-page 324 en
pubs.volume 51 en
dc.identifier.pmid 11978254 en
pubs.author-url http://www.jfponline.com/?id=21643&tx_ttnews%5Btt_news%5D=178410&cHash=81dc0566899344fe2f81ddc7949ff0a9 en
pubs.end-page 328 en
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/RestrictedAccess en
pubs.subtype Article en
pubs.elements-id 63054 en
pubs.org-id Medical and Health Sciences en
pubs.org-id Population Health en
pubs.org-id Gen.Practice& Primary Hlthcare en
pubs.org-id School of Medicine en
pubs.org-id Medicine Department en
dc.identifier.eissn 1533-7294 en
pubs.record-created-at-source-date 2010-09-01 en
pubs.dimensions-id 11978254 en


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