The Moderating Effect of Self-Esteem on the Success of Negative-Direct Partner Regulation Strategies

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dc.contributor.advisor Overall, N en
dc.contributor.author Jayamaha, Shanuki en
dc.date.accessioned 2015-03-23T20:36:59Z en
dc.date.issued 2014 en
dc.identifier.citation 2014 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/24924 en
dc.description Full text is available to authenticated members of The University of Auckland only. en
dc.description.abstract Prior research has shown that engaging in negative and direct behaviours to change or regulate a romantic partner’s dissatisfying attitudes and behavior has important consequences for the success of those regulation attempts. However, prior research has not examined whether individual dispositions influence the relative success of negative-direct partner regulation strategies. The current research investigated whether the self-esteem of regulation agents influenced the longitudinal outcomes of negative-direct partner regulation strategies. In Study 1, participants in committed relationships (N = 156) rated their regulation attempts, the types of regulation strategies they enacted, and the success of their regulation attempts across a six month period. In Study 2, individuals (N = 78) reported on their regulation behaviour and the degree to which their partner attempted to improve their relationship every day for a period of 10 days. In Study 3, both members of committed couples reported on their regulation attempts, described the regulation strategies they used, and reported the success of regulation attempts three months later. In all three studies, the self-esteem of regulation agents was also assessed. The results revealed that negative-direct partner regulation strategies were associated with lower regulation success over time when regulation agents were lower in self-esteem (Study 1 and 3). In contrast, negative-direct regulation strategies were more successful when agents with high self-esteem engaged in negative-direct partner regulation strategies (Study 2). These results illustrate that negative-direct partner regulation strategies will not be beneficial when enacted by individuals with low self-esteem, probably because the chronic negativity associated with low self-esteem creates a relationship context that dilutes the power of negative-direct strategies to convey that problems are severe and it is important that targeted partners change. Implications and directions for future research are discussed. en
dc.publisher ResearchSpace@Auckland en
dc.relation.ispartof Masters Thesis - University of Auckland en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. en
dc.rights Restricted Item. Available to authenticated members of The University of Auckland. en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/nz/ en
dc.title The Moderating Effect of Self-Esteem on the Success of Negative-Direct Partner Regulation Strategies en
dc.type Thesis en
thesis.degree.grantor The University of Auckland en
thesis.degree.level Masters en
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The Author en
pubs.elements-id 472497 en
pubs.record-created-at-source-date 2015-01-13 en


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