How do speech language therapists in New Zealand perceive the psychological impact of communication difficulties?

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dc.contributor.author Gibson, R en
dc.contributor.author Purdy, Suzanne en
dc.date.accessioned 2015-05-29T05:01:38Z en
dc.date.issued 2014-06 en
dc.identifier.citation Speech, Language and Hearing, 2014, 17 (2), pp. 116 - 122 en
dc.identifier.issn 2050-571X en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/25686 en
dc.description.abstract A growing body of research demonstrates the links between communication impairment and psychological difficulties including depression, anxiety, other affective disorders, anger, and aggression. Research has demonstrated high levels of psychological disorders in conditions such as stroke, traumatic brain injury, Parkinson's disease, autism, and specific language impairment, and communication impairment among individuals with psychiatric conditions. There are also demonstrated links between communication impairments and psychosocial functioning. However, there has been less research into how speech language therapists (SLTs) perceive the psychological and psychosocial difficulties of patients with communication disorders, and how they address these difficulties within the course of SLT interventions. This survey-based research study investigated the perceptions of SLTs working in New Zealand as to the impact of psychological and psychosocial difficulties on their clients, and whether this varied depending on the SLTs’ training, their experience and their access to psychology within their team. Respondents commented on the impact of psychological and psychosocial difficulties on their clients and family/whanau, and on their perceptions of what could benefit SLTs in addressing these difficulties within the context of SLT scope of practice. Of the respondents 29.3% reported that roughly 50% or more of their clients had significant psychological difficulties, and 51.2% reported that roughly 50% or more of their clients had significant psychosocial difficulties. No correlation was found between the years of experience of SLTs, or their access to psychology for their clients, and their perceptions of the psychological and psychosocial needs of their clients. Overall 76.5% of respondents reported that they did not feel prepared by their initial SLT training to address the psychological needs of their clients, and 77.5% reported that they felt SLTs needed more training to be able to adequately manage these needs within the context of SLT sessions. en
dc.language eng en
dc.publisher Maney Publishing en
dc.relation.ispartofseries Speech, Language and Hearing en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Details obtained from http://www.maneyonline.com.ezproxy.auckland.ac.nz/page/authors/copyrightandpermissions en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.subject Speech language therapy en
dc.subject Psychological impact en
dc.subject Psychosocial impact en
dc.title How do speech language therapists in New Zealand perceive the psychological impact of communication difficulties? en
dc.type Journal Article en
dc.identifier.doi 10.1179/2050572813Y.0000000026 en
pubs.issue 2 en
pubs.begin-page 116 en
pubs.volume 17 en
dc.rights.holder Copyright: Maney Publishing en
pubs.author-url http://www.maneyonline.com/doi/abs/10.1179/2050572813Y.0000000026 en
pubs.end-page 122 en
pubs.publication-status Published en
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/RestrictedAccess en
pubs.subtype Article en
pubs.elements-id 425752 en
pubs.org-id Science en
pubs.org-id Psychology en
dc.identifier.eissn 2050-5728 en
pubs.record-created-at-source-date 2014-02-08 en


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