Developing the 'good' citizen: Teachers' beliefs and perceptions about the purpose of social studies education

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dc.contributor.advisor Hawe, E en
dc.contributor.advisor Carpenter, V en
dc.contributor.author Siteine, Alexis en
dc.date.accessioned 2015-11-23T22:17:51Z en
dc.date.issued 2006 en
dc.identifier.citation 2006 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/27550 en
dc.description Full text is available to authenticated members of The University of Auckland only. en
dc.description.abstract This study investigated primary teachers’ beliefs and perceptions about the purpose of social studies education. A two-phase sequential mixed methods approach was used to gather data. The aim of the first phase was to validate the instrument—a questionnaire—for use in phase two. Once the validity of the questionnaire was established, it was to be used to ascertain teachers’ beliefs about the purpose of social studies education with reference to four traditions established in the literature (Barr, Barth, & Shermis, 1978; Barr, Graham, Hunter, Keown, & McGee, 1997). The aim of phase two was to find out teachers’ beliefs and perceptions about the purpose of social studies education. During the first phase, the instrument was validated with 64 teachers enrolled in a programme of professional learning at a tertiary institute. The factor analysis revealed that teachers did not see social studies in terms of the four traditions established in the literature. Rather, elements of these traditions were grouped by the teachers in a way that reflected four distinct ‘rationales’: Development of Self, Generic Critical Thinking Skills, Transmission of Societal Norms, and Disciplines of Social Science. While some overlap existed between the established traditions and teachers’ rationales, the differences were significant. Of the rationales, Development of Self was considered the primary purpose of social studies education. In the second phase, in-depth interviews with eight Years 7 and 8 teachers revealed that they saw the overarching purpose social studies education as the development of ‘good’ citizens. These teachers believed that good citizens were cultivated in social studies programmes that developed students’ beliefs, attitudes and values; affirmed their identity, examined issues and problems; and developed students’ skills. Although each of these areas can be examined through individual (pluribus) and/or societal (unum) dimensions, these teachers confined their view of the good citizen to the individual or pluribus dimension of citizenship. As such, they focused on the development of self through the raising of students’ self-esteem, self-concept, and self-confidence. This restricted view fell short of developing the personal efficacy and self-empowerment that leads to critical, active citizenship. Of further interest was the finding that the espoused beliefs of the eight teachers about the purpose of social studies education were not borne out in their written planning. In contrast to the emphasis on development of the self as the primary purpose of social studies, teachers’ unit plans indicated that the development of knowledge and understanding was the central purpose of social studies education. en
dc.publisher ResearchSpace@Auckland en
dc.relation.ispartof Masters Thesis - University of Auckland en
dc.relation.isreferencedby UoA99167018114002091 en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. en
dc.rights Restricted Item. Available to authenticated members of The University of Auckland. en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/nz/ en
dc.title Developing the 'good' citizen: Teachers' beliefs and perceptions about the purpose of social studies education en
dc.type Thesis en
thesis.degree.discipline Education en
thesis.degree.grantor The University of Auckland en
thesis.degree.level Masters en
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The Author en
pubs.elements-id 85573 en
pubs.org-id Education and Social Work en
pubs.org-id Critical Studies in Education en
pubs.record-created-at-source-date 2010-09-01 en


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