Screen-based Media and Energy Intake in New Zealand Youth: Experimental Effects of Screens on Energy Intake and an Assessment of the Role of the Family and Home-Screen Environment on Behaviours

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dc.contributor.advisor Maddison, R en
dc.contributor.advisor Mhurchu,, C en
dc.contributor.author Marsh, Samantha en
dc.date.accessioned 2015-11-25T02:12:57Z en
dc.date.issued 2015 en
dc.identifier.citation 2015 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/27556 en
dc.description.abstract Background: Lack of effectiveness in screen-use interventions may be due to a failure to focus on the mechanisms linking screens and overweight, failure to keep up-to-date with changes to the environment, and too large a focus on the individual. Aim: To assess effects of traditional and emerging screen-use behaviours on energy intake (EI), and describe the modern screen environment in New Zealand. Methods: Section one consisted of a systematic review and two laboratory studies comparing EI between (1) traditional screen activities (watching television [TV], recreational computer use, and video game (VG) play), in males aged 9-13 years (n=20), and (2) single-screen use (watching TV) and multi-screen use (watching TV and access to a tablet computer and cell phone), in male and females aged 13-18 years (n=78). Section two consisted of a systematic review, an online parent survey (n=230), and an online adolescent (n=218) survey, which investigated the home screen environment, and parental and adolescent attitudes towards screens. Results: The first review showed that screen time was associated with increased EI; however, research tended to focus on TV’s. In study 1, total EI was significantly greater in the TV versus computer condition (+136 kcal; 95% CI 4, 267; p=0.04), with a trend towards greater EI in the TV versus VG condition (+125 kcal; -6, +255; p=0.06); however, EI did not differ between the computer and VG conditions (-11 kcal; -142, +121; p=0.87). In study 2, total EI did not differ between the multi-screen and single-screen groups (difference +77 kcal; -166, +320). The second systematic review found that active parent/family involvement may be necessary in screen-time interventions aimed at children and adolescents. A significant correlation between average parental screen time and average adolescent screen time (R2=0.726; p<0.001) was found in the surveys, and cell phone and computer use were the two most popular screen-based activities reported by adolescents. Discussion: A comprehensive, evidence-based approach to reduce screen use is proposed, whereby the focus of the intervention is moved from the individual child to the family unit, and both total screen time and specific screen-use behaviours shown to impact negatively health are targeted. en
dc.publisher ResearchSpace@Auckland en
dc.relation.ispartof PhD Thesis - University of Auckland en
dc.relation.isreferencedby UoA99264827597102091 en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/nz/ en
dc.title Screen-based Media and Energy Intake in New Zealand Youth: Experimental Effects of Screens on Energy Intake and an Assessment of the Role of the Family and Home-Screen Environment on Behaviours en
dc.type Thesis en
thesis.degree.discipline Health Sciences en
thesis.degree.grantor The University of Auckland en
thesis.degree.level Doctoral en
thesis.degree.name PhD en
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The Author en
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/OpenAccess en
pubs.elements-id 506235 en
pubs.org-id Medical and Health Sciences en
pubs.org-id Population Health en
pubs.record-created-at-source-date 2015-11-25 en


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