Asteroid feeding biology

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Martin, Richard Bowden en
dc.date.accessioned 2008-09-10T01:18:02Z en
dc.date.available 2008-09-10T01:18:02Z en
dc.date.issued 1970 en
dc.identifier.issn THESIS 593.93 M38 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/2883 en
dc.description Restricted Item. Print thesis available in the University of Auckland Library or may be available through Interlibrary Loan. en
dc.description.abstract General Information: With the digestive system, almost more than any other, it is clear that form is intimately determined by function. Of all systems, it is the gut that shows perhaps the least constancy of pattern within a group. While its distinct form may be in general the outcome of evolutionary affinity and descent, special adaptations will repeatedly present themselves to deal with particular types of food. In some groups adaptive diversity appears great; in others there appears to be an inherited stereotype with relatively little adaptive variation. en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher ResearchSpace@Auckland en
dc.relation.isreferencedby UoA216360 en
dc.rights Restricted Item. Print thesis available in the University of Auckland Library or may be available through Interlibrary Loan. en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.title Asteroid feeding biology en
dc.type Thesis en
thesis.degree.grantor The University of Auckland en
thesis.degree.level Masters en
thesis.degree.name Master of Arts, Science en
dc.subject.marsden Fields of Research::270000 Biological Sciences::270500 Zoology en
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/ClosedAccess en


Files in this item

Find Full text

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Share

Search ResearchSpace


Browse

Statistics