The common heritage of mankind : a principle compromised in Antarctica

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dc.contributor.author Braks, Antoinette Josephine en
dc.date.accessioned 2008-09-12T02:11:59Z en
dc.date.available 2008-09-12T02:11:59Z en
dc.date.issued 1984 en
dc.identifier.issn THESIS INT. K BRA en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/2899 en
dc.description Restricted Item. Print thesis available in the University of Auckland Library or may be available through Interlibrary Loan. en
dc.description.abstract The isolation of the Antarctic continent from the inhabited regions of the world delayed its discovery and exploration. During his voyage of 1772-1775 Captain James Cook was the first to circumnavigate the area which he reported to be enveloped in pack-ice, icebergs, mist and snow. Almost half a century lapsed before the mainland was sighted in 1820. This honour was claimed by three men: an American, Englishman and Russianl.Expeditions to Antarctica in the late nineteenth century were primarily concerned with sealing and Whaling while the twentieth century marked the first voyages of intrepid explorers who penetrated into the interior of the continent. Today the environment of the South Pole is no longer shrouded in mystery. Antarctica is a continent covered with a shield of ice and a thick blanket of snow. It is edged with colossal icebergs and surrounded by a vast ring of pack-ice. Even during the summer months conventional vessels often require the assistance of ice-breakers to facilitate navigation around the continent. Antarctica's inhospitable land surface is coupled with a hostile climate. The temperature seldom climbs above freezing point and then only in the more favourable areas of the Antarctic Peninsula. Winds may move at 150 knots or more creating blizzards and white-out conditions. Water exists only in the form of snow as there is no rainfall year round. In fact, Antarctica is the coldest, windiest and driest place on earth. en
dc.publisher ResearchSpace@Auckland en
dc.relation.isreferencedby UoA709451 en
dc.rights Restricted Item. Print thesis available in the University of Auckland Library or may be available through Interlibrary Loan. en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.title The common heritage of mankind : a principle compromised in Antarctica en
dc.type Thesis en
thesis.degree.grantor The University of Auckland en
thesis.degree.level Masters en
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/ClosedAccess en


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