Conservation beyond park boundaries : the politics of indigenous forest protection in Te Urewera

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dc.contributor.author Garcia, Celina en
dc.date.accessioned 2008-09-17T22:19:49Z en
dc.date.available 2008-09-17T22:19:49Z en
dc.date.issued 2007 en
dc.identifier.issn THESIS en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/2925 en
dc.description Restricted Item. Print thesis available in the University of Auckland Library or may be available through Interlibrary Loan. en
dc.description.abstract The current trend for off-park conservation represents a new compromise in nature-society relations that extends conventional environmental protection approaches to new territories and discourses, including habitat protection projects on private lands in the 'borderlands' of previously established protected areas. Despite the apparent realignment of conservation agendas with the development needs of indigenous communities in these 'alternative socio-natural arrangements,' environmental conflict persists in 'new' spaces of conservation. Recent critics have highlighted that insufficient economic incentives deter landowner participation in such conservation schemes as habitat protection on private land. Yet these analyses do not fully explain the limited appeal of habitat protection initiatives. In this thesis, I employ a political ecology perspective to explore the politics of indigenous forest protection on Maori land in the borderlands of Te Urewera National Park. Through this examination I argue that a failure to address the social complexities of conservation leads to the persistence of conflict in 'new' spaces of conservation. In particular, the porous and frequently contested nature of protected area boundaries indicates that unresolved tensions between conservation agendas and indigenous peoples' rights to self governance will inevitably affect the willingness of local communities to undertake conservation activities on lands adjoining conservation territories. This suggests 'the need to move beyond analyses which focus on reparation and private property rights as explanations for continued resistance in new conservation spaces. Instead, greater recognition of the role of indigenous polities is needed in conservation debates. Given the importance of addressing both social and ecological objectives in new conservation models, recognising the role and place of indigeneity in natural resource debates may prove a necessary step towards achieving conservation with social justice. en
dc.publisher ResearchSpace@Auckland en
dc.relation.isreferencedby UoA1784071 en
dc.rights Restricted Item. Print thesis available in the University of Auckland Library or may be available through Interlibrary Loan. en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.title Conservation beyond park boundaries : the politics of indigenous forest protection in Te Urewera en
dc.type Thesis en
thesis.degree.grantor The University of Auckland en
thesis.degree.level Masters en
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/ClosedAccess en


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