Spatial and temporal variation in Hawaiian residential architecture : a seriation study of selected coastal settlements in northern Hawai’i Island

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dc.contributor.author O’Connor, Blaze Valeska en
dc.date.accessioned 2008-09-22T01:24:47Z en
dc.date.available 2008-09-22T01:24:47Z en
dc.date.issued 1998 en
dc.identifier.issn THESIS en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/2962 en
dc.description Restricted Item. Print thesis available in the University of Auckland Library or may be available through Interlibrary Loan. en
dc.description.abstract Establishing chronologies plays a vital role in archaeological analysis and interpretation. The creation of relatively fine resolution chronologies through seriation is a cost effective approach which can be readily applied to new assemblages as they arise. This study applies the seriation method to dry-masonry residential foundations in the coastal Hawai'i Island settlements of Pahinahina, Kahua 1 and Kahua 2, Makiloa and Kaloko. The architectural data used in the study were collected during a Global Positioning System based field survey in Pahinahina and Makiloa, and by field checking plan map details from a previous survey in Kahua 1 and 2. In addition, data from Kaloko collected by other researchers are also included. Independent dating of structures in Kaloko and Kahua 2 through radiocarbon and excavation confirms that successful chronologies based on temporally sensitive architectural traits are established. The seriation results confinn aspects of prior models for shifts in architectural form based on archaeological inference. The seriation demonstrates that residential architectural traits such as core filled walls measuring over one metre in height are indicative of historic period construction events. In contrast low-walled structures exhibiting curvilinear plans are associated with prehistoric construction. While such trends generally occur across all of the study areas, suggestive ofinter-district interaction, some variation between individual settlements is exhibited. A range of possible explanations for these patterns are discussed. The seriation results are indicative ofthe duration of occupation for individual ahupua'a, and hence can be compared with models for population movement through the prehistoric and historic periods. The successful incorporation of data from a previous survey in the seriations suggests that the method can be applied to other Hawaiian settlements which have already been documented. en
dc.publisher ResearchSpace@Auckland en
dc.relation.isreferencedby UoA840023 en
dc.rights Restricted Item. Print thesis available in the University of Auckland Library or may be available through Interlibrary Loan. en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.title Spatial and temporal variation in Hawaiian residential architecture : a seriation study of selected coastal settlements in northern Hawai’i Island en
dc.type Thesis en
thesis.degree.grantor The University of Auckland en
thesis.degree.level Masters en
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/ClosedAccess en


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