Does 'Healthy Conversation Skills' Training affect client outcomes?: Perceptions of women cared for by maternal and child health care providers who have received ‘Healthy Conversations Skills’ training.

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dc.contributor.advisor Jaquiery, A en
dc.contributor.advisor Gunn, C en
dc.contributor.advisor Barker, M en
dc.contributor.advisor Lawrence, W en
dc.contributor.author Puloka, Aivi en
dc.date.accessioned 2016-10-11T20:31:23Z en
dc.date.issued 2016 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/30714 en
dc.description Full text is available to authenticated members of The University of Auckland only. en
dc.description.abstract Aim: To explore the perceptions of Pacific women who used services provided by maternal and child health workforce that have completed the ‘Healthy Conversation Skills’ training. Background: Non-communicable diseases (NCD) such as diabetes and obesity may have their origins in early life, evidenced by Gravida and Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) research. However, because interventions to address such diseases usually occur in adulthood, child and maternal health care providers have only recently been made aware of their potential role in NCD prevention. It is therefore crucial to provide these workforces with effective communication strategies to improve health literacy and self-efficacy in their clientele, to positively support early life health. The Healthy Start Workforce Project is a Ministry of Health funded initiative implemented by Gravida, which provides maternal and child health workforce education about the importance of nutrition and physical activity in pregnancy and early life, and training in the ‘Healthy Conversations Skills’ (HCS) communication programme developed by the University of Southampton, UK. HCS training has been shown to alter staff practice. However, it is not known whether this impacts on outcomes for end users. Methods: A qualitative study was performed using semi-structured focus group discussions. Recruitment was done via the Pacific Healthy Babies Healthy Futures (HBHF) Workshops. Participants were Pacific women who had received health education from staff who had undergone HCS training. Audio recordings were transcribed, coded and themes reviewed by thematic analysis. Results: Three major themes emerged regarding diet and physical activity in pregnancy and postnatal life: Importance of healthy lifestyle; Barriers to healthy lifestyle; and the Influences of Staff and HBHF workshops on lifestyle. Women had a significant role in enhancing lifestyle changes intrauterine, in the home and community. Conclusion: Healthy Conversation Skills (HCS) Training provided maternal and child care workforce with effective communication strategies to support healthy lifestyle changes in the Pacific pregnant and postnatal women. HCS increased women’s health literacy and self-efficacy by the use of SMARTER Plans to effectively translate health knowledge into healthy lifestyle. Early Lifestyle intervention is highly recommended to halt the intergenerational cycle of diabetes in the Pacific peoples. en
dc.publisher ResearchSpace@Auckland en
dc.relation.ispartof Masters Thesis - University of Auckland en
dc.relation.isreferencedby UoA99264877509702091 en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. en
dc.rights Restricted Item. Available to authenticated members of The University of Auckland. en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.title Does 'Healthy Conversation Skills' Training affect client outcomes?: Perceptions of women cared for by maternal and child health care providers who have received ‘Healthy Conversations Skills’ training. en
dc.type Thesis en
thesis.degree.discipline Health Sciences en
thesis.degree.grantor The University of Auckland en
thesis.degree.level Masters en
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The author en
pubs.elements-id 542637 en
pubs.record-created-at-source-date 2016-10-12 en


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