Parents, participation, partnership: Problematising New Zealand early childhood care and education

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dc.contributor.author Chan, Angel en
dc.contributor.author Ritchle, J en
dc.coverage.spatial Turku, Finland en
dc.date.accessioned 2016-12-05T02:38:56Z en
dc.date.issued 2016 en
dc.identifier.isbn 9789512956609 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/31228 en
dc.description.abstract Due to global migration, Aotearoa (New Zealand) is now home to more than 200 ethnic groups and categorised as a ‘superdiverse’ country (Royal Society of New Zealand, 2013; Statistics New Zealand, 2013). This presentation interrogates notions of teacher ‘partnership with parents’ within early childhood care and education (ECCE) settings in the context of a ‘superdiverse’ Aotearoa. The aspiration of involving families in New Zealand ECCE is strongly evident in Te Whāriki, the New Zealand early childhood curriculum. Special mention is made with regard to the need for “two-way communication that strengthens the partnership between the early childhood setting and families” (Ministry of Education, 1996, p. 30). Te Whāriki also clearly positions children’s learning and development as being “fostered if the well-being of their family and community is supported” and “their family, culture, knowledge and community are respected” (p. 42). The importance of partnership is further highlighted in a range of national literature (see for example: Billman, Geddes & Hedges, 2005; Grey & Horgan, 2003) and institutional documents (see for example: Children’s Commissioner, 2013; ECE Taskforce, 2011; ERO, 2013a, 2013b, 2013c). This presentation will report qualitative findings collected from a process of documentary analysis and participant narratives that involved both Māori (the indigenous people of Aotearoa) and Chinese immigrant families (one of the largest immigrant groups in Aotearoa). Findings from both national evaluative reports and our recent studies indicate that in many instances, members of the non-dominant cultural group do not experience the synergy of parent-teacher partnership, impacting children’s everyday life and wellbeing. Hybridity theory (Bhabha, 1994) and the notion of funds of knowledge (González, 2005) will be drawn upon to reinforce the need for teachers to proactively move beyond the hegemonic and traditional teacher-dominated practices, towards opening spaces of dialogic, fluid engagement with families whose backgrounds differ from their own. en
dc.description.uri https://www.goinginternational.eu/wp/de/the-vii-conference-on-childhood-studies-childhood-in-everyday-life/ en
dc.publisher Turku Child and Youth Research Institute en
dc.relation.ispartof The VII Conference on Childhood Studies: Childhood in Everyday Life en
dc.relation.ispartofseries The VII Conference on Childhood Studies: Childhood in Everyday Life en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.title Parents, participation, partnership: Problematising New Zealand early childhood care and education en
dc.type Conference Item en
pubs.author-url https://www.utupub.fi/bitstream/handle/10024/125475/Childhood2016_Abstract_book.pdf?sequence=2&isAllowed=y en
pubs.finish-date 2016-06-08 en
pubs.place-of-publication Turku, Finland en
pubs.start-date 2016-06-06 en
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/RestrictedAccess en
pubs.subtype Abstract en
pubs.elements-id 542578 en
pubs.org-id Education and Social Work en
pubs.org-id Curriculum and Pedagogy en
pubs.record-created-at-source-date 2016-10-10 en
pubs.online-publication-date 2016 en


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