Kaitaka and kahu-kiwi : a study of kingitanga adornment and self-decoration

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dc.contributor.author Muru-Lanning, Marama L en
dc.date.accessioned 2008-12-10T22:04:03Z en
dc.date.available 2008-12-10T22:04:03Z en
dc.date.issued 2001 en
dc.identifier THESIS 03-131 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/3222 en
dc.description Restricted Item. Print thesis available in the University of Auckland Library or may be available through Interlibrary Loan. en
dc.description.abstract This thesis explores how Kingitanga philosophy is activated through Waikato-Tainui members dressing In a unifonn manner so as 10 emphasize the unique style and selfdecoration of Kingilanga leaders. Consequently, knowledge of Waikato·Tainui's tribal dress code also allows dissenting tribal groups to visually express opposition through their dress. In the first half of the nineteenth century the most well·known Maori leaders were those who distinguished themselves and their people through successful fighting at inter-tribal banles. Yet the 18505 saw the emergence ofTe Kingitanga with its philosophies of peace and reconciliation. The hope was that Kingitanga would activate positive relationships between tribes and the Crown to stop the land loss many Maori were experiencing. In order to do this a change was required in the way Kingitanga leaders presented themselves. The guise of the warrior chief adorned with moko, kahu-kuri and Maori weaponry was no longer suitable. Rather, kaitaka robes and kahu-kiwi better reflected the new diplomacy of Kingitanga. Based on investigations using an array of Waikato-Tainui historic and ethnographic narrative, photo documentary from tribal archives and a number of anthropological and tribal perspectives, this study analyses why the kaitaka and kahu-kiwi were selected as the appropriate ceremonial garments for Kingitanga leaders. King Tawhi30 and Te Arikinui Te Atairangikaahu are the focus of discussions and consideration is given as to how they have utilised kaitaka and kahu-kjwi to demonstrate their roles as the consummate leaders for Waikato-Tainui people. Ultimately. this thesis shows that Kingitanga doctrine regulates the behaviour and self-decoration of Waikato-Tainui members at tribal gatherings and this effectively unifies Waikato-Tainui members into a strong collective unit which showcases the mana of their ariki. Keywords : activation, cloaks, Kingitanga, material culture, peace. self-decoration en
dc.publisher ResearchSpace@Auckland en
dc.relation.isreferencedby UoA1145792 en
dc.rights Restricted Item. Print thesis available in the University of Auckland Library or may be available through Interlibrary Loan. en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.title Kaitaka and kahu-kiwi : a study of kingitanga adornment and self-decoration en
dc.type Thesis en
thesis.degree.grantor The University of Auckland en
thesis.degree.level Masters en
dc.subject.marsden Fields of Research::420000 Language and Culture::420300 Cultural Studies::420306 Maori cultural studies en
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/ClosedAccess en


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