An investigation of how Hawaiki knowledge is fundamental for Maori leadership

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dc.contributor.author Curtis, N. T. en
dc.date.accessioned 2008-12-11T02:23:21Z en
dc.date.available 2008-12-11T02:23:21Z en
dc.date.issued 2005 en
dc.identifier THESIS 07-360 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/3238 en
dc.description Restricted Item. Print thesis available in the University of Auckland Library or may be available through Interlibrary Loan. en
dc.description.abstract In considering the central theme of the hypothesis that asks how Hawaiki knowledge is fundamental for Maori leadership, the thesis addresses three basic questions: i) Where did we come from? ii) Where have we been? iii) Where are we going? Inherent in the general approach and thrust of these questions, was the need to take into account the philosophical intent in order to develop a platform that will endure not only in the Maori World but also in the wider society of Aotearoa New Zealand. Accordingly, each question became the major goal for one of the three parts that eventually drove the thesis. Each part categorised a field of knowledge through gathering information, and subjecting it to a critical theoretical scrutiny. The intent was to challenge the status quo and the existing social relations not only of Pakeha domination and Maori subjection, but also existing social relations within Maoridom. Hence Traditional Knowledge; Contemporary Knowledge and Knowledge for Transformation are the three pathways, threaded together by Hawaiki Knowledge, that lead toward some fundamental assumptions: • Hawaiki epistemology basis of Maori thinking and spirituality • Recover traditional knowledge to provide a firm basis to cater appropriately for future needs eg Tohunga Collective • Develop more moral ethical component to create revitalisation opportunities for te reo, knowledge, and cultural development. • Encourage innovative possibilities in order to create frameworks to survive as Maori and be amenable to accommodate and adapt to new ideas both in Aotearoa and the international arena The thesis should contribute to a more authentic traditional knowledge in contemporary Maori society. Not to retrench but to mediate existing circumstances in ways that are positive, proactive and transformative. It should also contribute to current debates on Maori leadership and to reorient the focus away from people and personalities on to processes and outcomes of transformation. In brief the thesis is essentially a strategy for change - to move to what we want. en
dc.publisher ResearchSpace@Auckland en
dc.relation.isreferencedby UoA1745328 en
dc.rights Restricted Item. Print thesis available in the University of Auckland Library or may be available through Interlibrary Loan. en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.title An investigation of how Hawaiki knowledge is fundamental for Maori leadership en
dc.type Thesis en
thesis.degree.grantor The University of Auckland en
thesis.degree.level Masters en
dc.subject.marsden Fields of Research::370000 Studies in Human Society::379900 Other Studies In Human Society::379902 Indigenous studies en
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/ClosedAccess en


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