Ways of believing and behaving : understanding evidence for early Maori-European contact through archaeology and history : a case study at site Z17/16, Waihau Beach, East Coast

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dc.contributor.author Ramezanian-Abhari, Tanya Louise en
dc.date.accessioned 2008-12-11T04:23:36Z en
dc.date.available 2008-12-11T04:23:36Z en
dc.date.issued 2003 en
dc.identifier THESIS 04-309 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/3253 en
dc.description Restricted Item. Print thesis available in the University of Auckland Library or may be available through Interlibrary Loan. en
dc.description.abstract This research is 8n attempt to reconsider the early post-contact period of Maori· European interaction through history and archaeology. Generally, this period of New Zealand history has been studied by historians. with archaeological research only contributing a limited amount. In the past. the period of early contact was regarded as a time of major change, and particularly for indigenous culture. A recurring assumption has been that indigenous culture disintegrated all contact with European society. However, recent studies have indicated that this is not necessarily the case. The goal of this study was to utilize historical and material manifestations of this period of early contact in New Zealand, using a specific case study pa site, Z17116, at Waihau Beach on the East Coast of New Zealand, in an attempt to discern patterns of early Maori-European contact, and the kinds of interactions and changes that resulted. The historical and archaeological evidence indicated that Maori and European societies on the East Coast were interacting in a number of contexts, with contact being initiated by both parties. While change was evident i.n the archaeological and historical records, older forms persisted, suggesting that contact was not to have a 'fatal impact' upon Maori society. instead, I argue for some change, but that this change occurred within a Maori frame of reference. which meant that Maori society was able to appropriate and adapt European beliefs, behaviours, and material Culture, without experiencing cultural disintegration. The overall conclusion is that early contact with Europeans allowed Maori to appropriate European things, creating an extension to extant society. en
dc.publisher ResearchSpace@Auckland en
dc.relation.isreferencedby UoA1225883 en
dc.rights Restricted Item. Print thesis available in the University of Auckland Library or may be available through Interlibrary Loan. en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.title Ways of believing and behaving : understanding evidence for early Maori-European contact through archaeology and history : a case study at site Z17/16, Waihau Beach, East Coast en
dc.type Thesis en
thesis.degree.grantor The University of Auckland en
thesis.degree.level Masters en
dc.subject.marsden Fields of Research::370000 Studies in Human Society::379900 Other Studies In Human Society::379902 Indigenous studies en
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/ClosedAccess en


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