Prehistoric Māori fishing at Tauroa Point, Northland, New Zealand

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dc.contributor.author Wichman, Victoria Lee en
dc.date.accessioned 2009-01-08T20:47:38Z en
dc.date.available 2009-01-08T20:47:38Z en
dc.date.issued 2006 en
dc.identifier THESIS 06-437 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/3305 en
dc.description Restricted Item. Print thesis available in the University of Auckland Library or may be available through Interlibrary Loan. en
dc.description.abstract Several archaeological studies have been examined with regard to New Zealand prehistory, yet few ofthese stlldies have early time sequences combined with significant temporal depth. And, although there are many archaeological studies in New Zealand based on prehistoric Maori fishing practices, there are few within the Far North region of the North Island. Tauroa Point, located within the Far North District, is an interesting example of an early prehistoric Maori fishing camp (A.D. 1220-1390), as well as evidence during a late period in New Zealand (post-1650 A.D.). The fish bone from two different Tauroa Point excavations was analysed to understand whether patterns of change could be identified through time within an area that has a significant time sequence. Several variables were measured such as taxonomic abundance and richness. These measures were quantified by examining and identifying three fish bone assemblages by the number of identified specimens using the five paired diagnostic jaw bones, or jawNISP. Fish taxa were also evaluated by assessing diet and habitat preferences as an aid in understanding fishing technologies. The results of these analyses show that fishing at Tauroa Point was relatively stable through time, with a focus on carnivores such as snapper and wrasses. Yet, there are some indications that catch richness may have changed over time. This study contributes to unresolved regional issues, particularly in the context of faunal analysis, as well as broadening our knowledge of Maori settlement and subsistence practices evidenced within early and late periods in the Far North region ofNew Zealand. KEY WORDS: Faunal analysis, zooarchaeology, fish remains, subsistence, New Zealand prehistory, Far North District, Tauroa Point, Muriwhenua. en
dc.publisher ResearchSpace@Auckland en
dc.relation.isreferencedby UoA1671738 en
dc.rights Restricted Item. Print thesis available in the University of Auckland Library or may be available through Interlibrary Loan. en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.title Prehistoric Māori fishing at Tauroa Point, Northland, New Zealand en
dc.type Thesis en
thesis.degree.grantor The University of Auckland en
thesis.degree.level Masters en
dc.subject.marsden Fields of Research::370000 Studies in Human Society::379900 Other Studies In Human Society::379902 Indigenous studies en
dc.subject.marsden Fields of Research::420000 Language and Culture::420300 Cultural Studies::420306 Maori cultural studies en
dc.subject.marsden Fields of Research::430000 History and Archaeology::430200 Archaeology and Prehistory::430204 Archaeology of complex societies: Asia, Africa, Oceania and the Americas en
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/ClosedAccess en


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