Neural progenitor cells in the partial progressive 6-OHDA lesion rat model and the post-mortem human brain in Parkinson’s disease

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Faull, Richard en
dc.contributor.advisor Connor, Bronwen en
dc.contributor.author Aponso, Palingu M. en
dc.date.accessioned 2009-01-26T22:14:18Z en
dc.date.available 2009-01-26T22:14:18Z en
dc.date.issued 2007 en
dc.identifier.citation Thesis (PhD--Anatomy with Radiology)--University of Auckland, 2007 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/3352 en
dc.description Restricted Item. Print thesis available in the University of Auckland Library or may be available through Interlibrary Loan. en
dc.description.abstract The demonstration of endogenous progenitor cells in the adult mammalian brain has raised the exciting possibility that progenitor cells could have potential use in cell replacement therapy for neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson’s disease. Previous studies have shown that progenitor cells in the adult mammalian brain undergo proliferation and neurogenesis in response to neuronal cell loss. In this study, immunohistochemical techniques were used to demonstrate progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation in the subventricular zone (SVZ) adjacent to the striatum/caudate nucleus and in the midbrain regions, in response to dopamine (DA) cell death in the substantia nigra, using the partial progressive 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion rat model of Parkinson’s disease and post-mortem human Parkinson’s disease brains. In the rat model, multiple intraperitoneal injections of the mitotic marker bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) injected at various time points showed, a significant increase in BrdU positive cells in the SVZ, striatum and the midbrain regions of 6-OHDA-treated rats compared to SHAM controls. Further, the newborn cells were shown to produce glial cells in the striatum of 6-OHDA-treated rats. The normal and Parkinson's disease human brains were stained with a proliferative marker, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), to label dividing cells. The results demonstrated a significant 2.1-fold increase of PCNA positive cells in the SVZ adjacent to the caudate nucleus when compared to normal brains. Close inspection of individual human brains demonstrated significant asymmetry between the left and the right hemisphere of one Parkinson’s disease brain treated with deep brain stimulation. Further, the presence of migrating neuroblasts and glial cells was also demonstrated in the Parkinson’s disease human brains. The results in this thesis demonstrate progenitor cell proliferation in response to DA cell loss in the experimental rodent brain and the human Parkinson’s disease brain and further, indicate the regenerative potential of the adult mammalian brain in Parkinson’s disease. The findings from this thesis suggest the potential for the development of novel therapeutic approaches in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher ResearchSpace@Auckland en
dc.relation.ispartof PhD Thesis - University of Auckland en
dc.relation.isreferencedby UoA99173907814002091 en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated en
dc.rights Restricted Item. Print thesis available in the University of Auckland Library or may be available through Interlibrary Loan. en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.title Neural progenitor cells in the partial progressive 6-OHDA lesion rat model and the post-mortem human brain in Parkinson’s disease en
dc.type Thesis en
thesis.degree.discipline Anatomy with Radiology en
thesis.degree.grantor The University of Auckland en
thesis.degree.level Doctoral en
thesis.degree.name PhD en
dc.subject.marsden Fields of Research::320000 Medical and Health Sciences en
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The author en
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/RestrictedAccess en
dc.identifier.wikidata Q112869722


Files in this item

There are no files associated with this item.

Find Full text

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Share

Search ResearchSpace


Browse

Statistics