Appraisal of donor steatosis in liver transplantation: A survey of current practice in Australia and New Zealand

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dc.contributor.author Dare, AJ en
dc.contributor.author Phillips, Anthony en
dc.contributor.author Chu, M en
dc.contributor.author Hickey, Anthony en
dc.contributor.author Bartlet, ASJR en
dc.date.accessioned 2017-07-05T21:39:18Z en
dc.date.available 2012-06-08 en
dc.date.issued 2012-12-14 en
dc.identifier.citation Transplant Research and Risk Management, 14 December 2012, 4, 31 - 37 en
dc.identifier.issn 1179-1616 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/34014 en
dc.description.abstract Background: Hepatic steatosis is increasingly encountered among organ donors. Currently, there is no consensus guideline as to the type or degree of donor steatosis considered acceptable for liver transplantation (LT), and little is known about local practices in this area. The aim of this survey was to evaluate current clinical practices amongst liver transplant surgeons in Australia and New Zealand (ANZ) in the evaluation and use of steatotic donor livers in LT. Methods: An anonymous online twelve-question survey was emailed to all practicing LT surgeons in ANZ (n = 23) in January 2010. Results: The response rate was 83%. Estimated prevalence of steatosis in donor livers was between 40% and 60%. In determining suitability for LT, 90% of respondents reported rejecting organs with "severe" steatosis based on visual and palpation grounds alone. A total of 68% sought further histological assessment if the donor liver looked bad and there were risk factors for steatosis. The majority of respondents performed only one biopsy of the liver (79%), using hematoxylin and eosin staining for fat assessment (53%). There was wide variation in the upper limit of steatosis considered to be acceptable for LT (40%-80% steatosis). A total of 21% of respondents still considered microvesicular steatosis a risk factor for primary graft nonfunction. Conclusion: This survey highlights the significant variation in the appraisal and use of steatotic grafts by LT surgeons in ANZ. Accurate evaluation and judicious use of mild and moderately steatotic grafts is required if we are to utilize the available donor pool best. © 2012 Dare et al, publisher and licensee Dove Medical Press Ltd. en
dc.language English en
dc.publisher Dove Press en
dc.relation.ispartofseries Transplant Research and Risk Management en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Details obtained from http://sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/issn/1179-1616/ https://www.dovepress.com/author_guidelines.php?content_id=696 en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/ en
dc.title Appraisal of donor steatosis in liver transplantation: A survey of current practice in Australia and New Zealand en
dc.type Journal Article en
dc.identifier.doi 10.2147/TRRM.S33407 en
pubs.begin-page 31 en
pubs.volume 4 en
pubs.author-url https://www.dovepress.com/appraisal-of-donor-steatosis-in-liver-transplantation-a-survey-of-curr-peer-reviewed-article-TRRM en
pubs.end-page 37 en
pubs.publication-status Published en
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/OpenAccess en
pubs.subtype Article en
pubs.elements-id 370794 en
pubs.org-id Medical and Health Sciences en
pubs.org-id School of Medicine en
pubs.org-id Surgery Department en
pubs.org-id Science en
pubs.org-id Biological Sciences en
pubs.org-id Science Research en
pubs.org-id Maurice Wilkins Centre (2010-2014) en
dc.identifier.eissn 1179-1616 en
pubs.record-created-at-source-date 2013-11-27 en


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