Pedagogical hesitations in a mobile technology rich learning environment: A self-study of redefining expertise

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dc.contributor.author Tolosa Izquierdo, Constanza en
dc.contributor.author Heap, Irene en
dc.contributor.author Ovens, Alan en
dc.contributor.author Garbett, Dawn en
dc.contributor.editor Garbett, D en
dc.contributor.editor Ovens, A en
dc.date.accessioned 2017-08-08T03:40:20Z en
dc.date.issued 2016 en
dc.identifier.citation In Being self-study researchers in a digital world: Future oriented research and pedagogy in teacher education. Editors: Garbett D, Ovens A. 16: 117-131. Springer, Singapore 2016 en
dc.identifier.isbn 978-3-319-39478-7 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/34906 en
dc.description.abstract At a time when advances in technologies continue to demand swift responses from education at all levels, we have used self-study to frame a critical discussion of the issues surrounding the impact of mobile technologies on teacher education, and on ourselves as teacher educators. As a group of lecturers in a large Faculty of Education, we identified possibilities for using mobile technologies in teaching practice beyond traditional models of teaching as transmission. We have researched our own practices in a way that helped us to imagine our teaching differently and enabled a sensitivity to pedagogy as a complex process. The study was underpinned by three key concepts: mobile learning as a conversational framework; feedback to make learning visible; and transformational teacher education. By working together as a collective, our experiences of individually integrating mobile technologies into our teaching were shared with others in the group through creative writing, observations, group debriefings, and journals. Through dialogic self-study conversations we were able to provoke and concentrate our tacit knowledge, examine how events were performed, challenge interpretations, offer alternatives, and thus rethink our experiences with technology in our lessons. Three issues arose from our analysis of the self-study data: issues of vulnerability; issues about the way we discerned and acted upon the feedback provided by our students; and the tension in our model(s) of teacher education. Our explorations on the educative value of mobile technologies challenged and changed our pedagogies in ways we had not thought possible before. We concluded that teaching in the future will almost definitely become increasingly dependent on technology yet expert teachers will always be defined by their expertise in the teaching role rather than their technical prowess. en
dc.publisher Springer en
dc.relation.ispartof Being self-study researchers in a digital world: Future oriented research and pedagogy in teacher education en
dc.relation.ispartofseries Self-Study of Teaching and Teacher Education Practices en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.title Pedagogical hesitations in a mobile technology rich learning environment: A self-study of redefining expertise en
dc.type Book Item en
dc.identifier.doi 10.1007/978-3-319-39478-7_9 en
pubs.begin-page 117 en
pubs.volume 16 en
dc.rights.holder Copyright: Springer en
pubs.end-page 131 en
pubs.place-of-publication Singapore en
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/RestrictedAccess en
pubs.elements-id 544294 en
pubs.org-id Education and Social Work en
pubs.org-id Curriculum and Pedagogy en
pubs.record-created-at-source-date 2016-10-31 en
pubs.online-publication-date 2016-09-14 en


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