Why do registered nurses want to leave the organisation and profession? Understanding the causes of nursing turnover intentions to help improve the retention of registered nurses

ResearchSpace Repository

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Parsons, M en
dc.contributor.advisor Boxall, P en
dc.contributor.advisor Sheridan, N en
dc.contributor.author Moloney, Willoughby en
dc.date.accessioned 2017-11-17T01:11:07Z en
dc.date.issued 2017 en
dc.date.submitted 2017-02-28 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/36451 en
dc.description.abstract Background: The combination of an ageing population and a growing prevalence of morbidity is placing increasing pressure on an ageing nursing workforce nearing retirement. Further to this, Registered Nurses (RN) who increased their hours or returned to the profession to supplement their family income during the global financial crisis may decide to reduce their hours or leave the profession as family financial circumstances improve. Solutions that address the anticipated nursing shortage should focus on the motivations of RNs and incentives to retain them. Aim: This study seeks to provide new knowledge and understanding concerning the motivations of RNs and the determinants of nursing turnover, so as to facilitate the development of initiatives that work towards improving nursing retention. Methods: This mixed-methods study involved three distinct phases. The semi-structured interviews in the first phase were analysed using a general inductive method of enquiry to develop key themes, which informed the national structured e-survey in the second and third phase. A total of 3,500 e-surveys were distributed via the New Zealand Nurses Organisation and a link to the e-survey was advertised in the Nursing Council of New Zealand’s newsletter. Regression analysis explored the research questions and structural equation modelling was used to confirm the research hypotheses. Participants: The qualitative phase involved purposive sampling of nurse leaders and RNs working in clinical practice (n=22), as well as key stakeholders including Health Workforce New Zealand and Nursing Council of New Zealand (n=2). The quantitative phase involved RNs (n=2910) from across New Zealand. Results: Over 50 percent of RNs reported intention to leave the organisation (ITLO) and 15 percent reported intention to leave the profession (ITLP). Statistically significant factors that affected ITLO were burnout, work-life interference, job satisfaction and work engagement. Statistically significant factors that affected ITLP were career orientation, job satisfaction and work engagement. Conclusion: Results highlight the significance that burnout and work engagement play in RN motivation and strengthen the evidence around initiatives that work to reduce burnout and improve work engagement to encourage RNs to remain in the workforce longer despite their changing circumstances. en
dc.publisher ResearchSpace@Auckland en
dc.relation.ispartof PhD Thesis - University of Auckland en
dc.relation.isreferencedby UoA99264960813002091 en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.title Why do registered nurses want to leave the organisation and profession? Understanding the causes of nursing turnover intentions to help improve the retention of registered nurses en
dc.type Thesis en
thesis.degree.discipline Nursing en
thesis.degree.grantor The University of Auckland en
thesis.degree.level Doctoral en
thesis.degree.name PhD en
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The author en
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/OpenAccess en
pubs.elements-id 644119 en
pubs.org-id Medical and Health Sciences en
pubs.org-id Nursing en
pubs.record-created-at-source-date 2017-08-03 en


Files in this item

Find Full text

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Share

Search ResearchSpace


Advanced Search

Browse

Statistics