Ending Modern-day Slavery (MDS): A study of the services provided by pro-foreign domestic helpers (FDHs), local non-profit organizations (NGOs) and charities attempting to empower FDHs from Indonesia and the Philippines working in Hong Kong

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dc.contributor.advisor Mayeda, D en
dc.contributor.author Au, Hiu Ching en
dc.date.accessioned 2018-04-30T02:22:36Z en
dc.date.issued 2017 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/37101 en
dc.description Available to authenticated members of The University of Auckland. en
dc.description.abstract Although slavery has been abolished since the nineteenth century, and the International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of their Families (ICRMW) and the International Labour Organization Convention No. 189 on Decent Work for Domestic Workers (C189) protect the rights of migrant workers and domestic workers, modern-day slavery (MDS) still exists in the contemporary world. According to The Global Slavery Index (GSI) (2017), as of 2016, there are 45.8 million modern-day slaves in 167 countries across the globe, of which 29,500 reside in Hong Kong. In this dissertation, I argue that the abuse and exploitation experienced by foreign domestic helpers (FDHs) at the hands of the governments from sending and receiving countries, recruitment agencies (RAs) and/or employers in Hong Kong is a form of MDS. First, the Indonesian and the Philippines governments force their nationals to leave home and work abroad to solve the problem of unemployment and repay foreign debts. The Philippines government even forces their nationals to remit large remittances. Second, the HKG has implemented policies and laws to protect the rights of employers more than employees, including a live-in requirement, Minimum Allowable Wage (MAW), no fix work hours, “two-week rule”, and the right of abode. Third, RAs have turned FDHs into “commodities” and forced them to pay excessive fees. Fourth, some employers forced their FDHs to work overtime, are denied rest days, are underpaid, suffered from starvation, physical, psychological and/or sexual abuse. Moreover, I argue that to a certain extent, the services provided by pro-FDHs local non-profit organizations (NGOs) and charities empower FDHs and attempt to end MDS in Hong Kong. Help for Domestic Workers (HELP), Mission for Migrant Workers (MFMW), Bethune House Migrant Women’s Refuge (BHMWR), The Association Concerning Sexual Violence Against Women (ACSBAW) and the PathFinders provide free services including legal advice, counselling, medical services, sharing groups, trainings, activities to temporary shelters for FDHs. There is not only a rise in the usage of their services over time, but the ecological model, “distraction”, “sharing” and “support” strategies used in their program help to empower FDHs and attempt to end MDS. Unfortunately, these interventions fail to make changes at the macro societal level. en
dc.publisher ResearchSpace@Auckland en
dc.relation.ispartof Masters Thesis - University of Auckland en
dc.relation.isreferencedby UoA en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. en
dc.rights Restricted Item. Available to authenticated members of The University of Auckland. en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.title Ending Modern-day Slavery (MDS): A study of the services provided by pro-foreign domestic helpers (FDHs), local non-profit organizations (NGOs) and charities attempting to empower FDHs from Indonesia and the Philippines working in Hong Kong en
dc.type Thesis en
thesis.degree.discipline Sociology en
thesis.degree.grantor The University of Auckland en
thesis.degree.level Masters en
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The author en
pubs.elements-id 738601 en
pubs.org-id Arts en
pubs.org-id Arts Admin en
pubs.org-id Group Services en
pubs.record-created-at-source-date 2018-04-30 en


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