When Scientific Consensus Meets Public Scepticism: Some Insights from Social Epistemology

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dc.contributor.author Russell, Matheson en
dc.coverage.spatial School of Population Health, University of Auckland en
dc.date.accessioned 2018-10-03T22:18:01Z en
dc.date.issued 2017-08-29 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/38626 en
dc.description.abstract Head of School’s Seminar Series, School of Population Health, University of Auckland. Why do many people reject the scientific consensus on public health issues such as climate change and the safety and efficacy of vaccines? It is tempting to think that those who reject the scientific consensus on such issues either lack the evidence that would lead them to accept the scientific view, or lack the ability to assess the evidence that is available. In this talk, I suggest that public scepticism in such cases is not due to lack of evidence or to deficits of reason; but rather that it is more likely due to the effect that social networks play in our lives as knowers and reasoners. Drawing on insights from the philosophical discipline of social epistemology, I outline a model of how we can and do (justifiably) form beliefs and judgments by deferring to what we are told by others. But I also explore some ways in which these reasoning process can go astray. In the final part of the talk, I offer some suggestions about what can be done to counteract these negative patterns of social reasoning, and, in particular, what scientists and health advocates can do to enhance the credibility of science in the public sphere. en
dc.relation.ispartof Head of School’s Seminar Series en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.title When Scientific Consensus Meets Public Scepticism: Some Insights from Social Epistemology en
dc.type Presentation en
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The author en
pubs.author-url https://mediastore.auckland.ac.nz/uploaded/project/CMS_FMHS/public/09-2017/532866B96EC94D4BAF2266329BB53687.preview en
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/RestrictedAccess en
pubs.subtype Invited en
pubs.elements-id 670163 en
pubs.org-id Arts en
pubs.org-id Humanities en
pubs.org-id Philosophy en
pubs.record-created-at-source-date 2017-09-18 en


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