The Ethics of Sharing: How Do Social Workers Decide What to Record in Shared Health Records?

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dc.contributor.author Cairns, I en
dc.contributor.author Jonas, Monique en
dc.contributor.author Wallis, Katharine en
dc.date.accessioned 2018-10-03T23:14:48Z en
dc.date.issued 2018 en
dc.identifier.citation Ethics and Social Welfare 12:4 348-369 2018 en
dc.identifier.issn 1749-6535 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/38646 en
dc.description.abstract Social workers form part of many healthcare teams. This role can involve in-depth conversations with clients and home visits. These encounters can reveal sensitive information, not all of which may be accessible to other members of the healthcare team. Most modern healthcare systems employ shared care records, which are populated by, and accessible to, multiple members of the healthcare team. Shared care records are valued for their capacity to enhance inter-professional communication and improve patient care. But this very capacity may increase an underlying tension between privacy and efficient, effective care. Ethical tensions can arise for health social workers between comprehensive documentation and protecting client privacy by limiting access to privileged information obtained in the context of a social work encounter. This qualitative empirical ethics study investigated health social workers' experiences of tensions between client privacy and maintaining complete records, and how they thought the tension should be resolved. Participant testimony informed a pragmatist approach to identify principles governing recording of sensitive information in shared care records. Three principles were identified: necessity, accuracy, and neutrality. Participants' reports of moral concerns about recording indicate that ethical tensions can occur. The identified principles offer a starting point for managing such tensions. en
dc.publisher Taylor & Francis (Routledge) en
dc.relation.ispartofseries Ethics and Social Welfare en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.rights.uri https://authorservices.taylorandfrancis.com/sharing-your-work/ en
dc.title The Ethics of Sharing: How Do Social Workers Decide What to Record in Shared Health Records? en
dc.type Journal Article en
dc.identifier.doi 10.1080/17496535.2017.1384849 en
pubs.issue 4 en
pubs.begin-page 348 en
pubs.volume 12 en
dc.rights.holder Copyright: Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group en
pubs.end-page 369 en
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/OpenAccess en
pubs.subtype Article en
pubs.elements-id 678159 en
pubs.org-id Medical and Health Sciences en
pubs.org-id Population Health en
pubs.org-id Health Systems en
pubs.record-created-at-source-date 2017-09-28 en
pubs.online-publication-date 2017 en


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