Increased milk consumption may improve body composition and bone health among pre-pubertal children

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dc.contributor.author Kruger, MC en
dc.contributor.author Awan, T en
dc.contributor.author Poulsen, Raewyn en
dc.contributor.author Kuhn-Sherlock, B en
dc.date.accessioned 2018-10-11T21:48:51Z en
dc.date.issued 2017 en
dc.identifier.citation EC Nutrition 11(1):17-29 21 Sep 2017 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/41025 en
dc.description.abstract The objectives of the study were to examine linear growth, body composition and bone mineral status of pre-pubertal children participating in the “Milk for Schools programme” over one year. The control group was recruited from schools that were not participating. This prospective study followed 118 pre pubertal children (5-10 years old) over one year. Body composition as well as whole body (WB) headless bone mineral content-(WB-BMC), bone mineral density (WB-BMD), lumbar spine BMC and BMD were measured with dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (Discovery A, Hologic, WI, USA). Anthropometric data including height, weight and waist circumference (WC) were collected. The total sample consisted of 58 children in the control group (C’s) and 60 in the milk group. At baseline, the milk group was significantly older, taller and had higher WB-BMD. There were no significant differences between the groups over one year for change in height, weight, BMI z-score, WC, WB-fat and lean body mass (LBM). There was a significant treatment*time interaction for WB area (p = 0.046) and a marginally significant on WB-BMC (p = 0.051) and BMC z-score (p = 0.093). The changes in WB-BMC, WB-BMD and z-score over one year were significantly associated with change in LBM (p < 0.001). WB fat mass was significantly associated with WB-BMC (p < 0.001). LBM and WB fat mass significantly predicted children’s bone health. The changes in WB- BMC and WB area were greater in the milk group over the year, with the BMC z-score increasing in the milk group but remaining stable in the controls. Keywords: Milk; Children; Bone; Body Composition; Food Frequency Questionnaire en
dc.publisher ECRONICON LIMITED en
dc.relation.ispartofseries EC Nutrition en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.rights.uri https://www.ecronicon.com/author-guidelines.php en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.title Increased milk consumption may improve body composition and bone health among pre-pubertal children en
dc.type Journal Article en
pubs.issue 1 en
pubs.begin-page 17 en
pubs.volume 11 en
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The author en
pubs.author-url https://www.ecronicon.com/ecnu/pdf/ECNU-11-00364.pdf en
pubs.end-page 29 en
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/OpenAccess en
pubs.subtype Article en
pubs.elements-id 687862 en
pubs.org-id Medical and Health Sciences en
pubs.org-id School of Medicine en
pubs.org-id Medicine Department en
pubs.record-created-at-source-date 2017-10-10 en
pubs.online-publication-date 2017-09-21 en


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