Micronutrient intake in advanced age: Te Puāwaitanga o Ngā Tapuwae Kia ora Tonu, Life and Living in Advanced Age: A Cohort Study in New Zealand (LiLACS NZ).

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dc.contributor.author Wham, Carol en
dc.contributor.author Teh, Ruth en
dc.contributor.author Moyes, Simon en
dc.contributor.author Rolleston, Anna en
dc.contributor.author Lanning, Marama en
dc.contributor.author Hayman, Karen en
dc.contributor.author Kerse, Ngaire en
dc.contributor.author Adamson, Ashley en
dc.date.accessioned 2018-10-15T00:51:25Z en
dc.date.issued 2016-11-09 en
dc.identifier.citation British Journal of Nutrition 116(10):1754-1769 2016 en
dc.identifier.issn 0007-1145 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/41499 en
dc.description.abstract A high prevalence of undernutrition has previously been reported in indigenous Māori (49 %) and non-Māori (38 %) octogenarians and may be associated with risk of micronutrient deficiencies. We examined vitamin and mineral intakes and the contributing food sources among 216 Māori and 362 non-Māori participating in Life and Living to Advanced age a Cohort Study in New Zealand, using a repeat 24-h multiple-pass recall. More than half of the Māori and non-Māori participants had intakes below the estimated average requirement from food alone for Ca, Mg and Se. Vitamin B6 (Māori women only), folate (women only), vitamin E (Māori women; all men) and Zn (men only) were low in these ethnic and sex subgroups. Women had intakes of higher nutrient density in folate, vitamin C, Ca, Mg, K, vitamin A (non-Māori) and β-carotene (Māori) compared with men (P<0·05). When controlling for age and physical function, β-carotene, folate, vitamin C, Ca and Mg were no longer significantly different, but vitamins B2, B12, E and D, Fe, Na, Se and Zn became significantly different for Māori between men and women. When controlling for age and physical function, vitamins A and C and Ca were no longer significantly different, but vitamin B2, Fe, Na and Zn became significantly different for non-Māori between men and women. For those who took nutritional supplements, Māori were less likely to be deficient in food alone intake of vitamin A, folate and Mg, whereas non-Maori were less likely to be deficient in intakes of Mg, K and Zn, but more likely to be deficient in vitamin B12 intake. A lack of harmonisation in nutrient recommendations hinders the interpretation of nutrient adequacy; nonetheless, Ca, Mg and Se are key micronutrients of concern. Milk and cheese were important contributions to Ca intake, whereas bread was a key source of Mg and Se. Examination of dietary intake related to biochemical status and health outcomes will establish the utility of these observations. en
dc.format.medium Print-Electronic en
dc.language eng en
dc.relation.ispartofseries The British journal of nutrition en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.rights.uri https://www.cambridge.org/core/services/open-access-policies/open-access-journals/green-open-access-policy-for-journals en
dc.title Micronutrient intake in advanced age: Te Puāwaitanga o Ngā Tapuwae Kia ora Tonu, Life and Living in Advanced Age: A Cohort Study in New Zealand (LiLACS NZ). en
dc.type Journal Article en
dc.identifier.doi 10.1017/s0007114516003597 en
pubs.begin-page 1 en
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The authors en
dc.identifier.pmid 27825397 en
pubs.end-page 16 en
pubs.publication-status Published en
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/OpenAccess en
pubs.subtype Journal Article en
pubs.elements-id 545781 en
pubs.org-id Maori en
pubs.org-id James Henare Research Centre en
pubs.org-id Medical and Health Sciences en
pubs.org-id Population Health en
pubs.org-id Gen.Practice& Primary Hlthcare en
dc.identifier.eissn 1475-2662 en
pubs.record-created-at-source-date 2016-11-10 en
pubs.dimensions-id 27825397 en


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