The effects of preterm birth on visual development.

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dc.contributor.author Leung, Myra en
dc.contributor.author Thompson, Benjamin en
dc.contributor.author Black, Joanna en
dc.contributor.author Dai, Shuan en
dc.contributor.author Alsweiler, Jane en
dc.date.accessioned 2018-11-06T21:31:55Z en
dc.date.issued 2018-01 en
dc.identifier.citation Clinical and Experimental Optometry 101(1):4-12 Jan 2018 en
dc.identifier.issn 0816-4622 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/44033 en
dc.description.abstract Children born very preterm are at a greater risk of abnormal visual and neurological development when compared to children born at full term. Preterm birth is associated with retinopathy of prematurity (a proliferative retinal vascular disease) and can also affect the development of brain structures associated with post-retinal processing of visual information. Visual deficits common in children born preterm, such as reduced visual acuity, strabismus, abnormal stereopsis and refractive error, are likely to be detected through childhood vision screening programs, ophthalmological follow-up or optometric care. However, routine screening may not detect other vision problems, such as reduced visual fields, impaired contrast sensitivity and deficits in cortical visual processing, that may occur in children born preterm. For example, visual functions associated with the dorsal visual processing stream, such as global motion perception and visuomotor integration, may be impaired by preterm birth. These impairments can continue into adolescence and adulthood and may contribute to the difficulties in learning (particularly reading and mathematics), attention, behaviour and cognition that some children born preterm experience. Improvements in understanding the mechanisms by which preterm birth affects vision will inform future screening and interventions for children born preterm. en
dc.format.medium Print-Electronic en
dc.language eng en
dc.relation.ispartofseries Clinical & experimental optometry en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. en
dc.rights This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Clinical and Experimental Optometry 101(1):4-12 Jan 2018 , which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/cxo.12578. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions. en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.rights.uri https://authorservices.wiley.com/author-resources/Journal-Authors/licensing/self-archiving.html en
dc.subject Humans en
dc.subject Vision Disorders en
dc.subject Premature Birth en
dc.subject Prevalence en
dc.subject Visual Perception en
dc.subject Pregnancy en
dc.subject Visual Acuity en
dc.subject Infant, Newborn en
dc.subject Infant, Premature en
dc.subject Female en
dc.subject Global Health en
dc.title The effects of preterm birth on visual development. en
dc.type Journal Article en
dc.identifier.doi 10.1111/cxo.12578 en
pubs.issue 1 en
pubs.begin-page 4 en
pubs.volume 101 en
dc.rights.holder Copyright: Optometry Australia en
dc.identifier.pmid 28868651 en
pubs.end-page 12 en
pubs.publication-status Published en
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/OpenAccess en
pubs.subtype Review en
pubs.subtype Journal Article en
pubs.elements-id 659608 en
pubs.org-id Liggins Institute en
pubs.org-id LiFePATH en
pubs.org-id Medical and Health Sciences en
pubs.org-id Optometry and Vision Science en
pubs.org-id School of Medicine en
pubs.org-id Paediatrics Child & Youth Hlth en
dc.identifier.eissn 1444-0938 en
pubs.record-created-at-source-date 2017-09-05 en
pubs.dimensions-id 28868651 en


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