Understanding the experiences of migrant Asian sex workers in New Zealand: An exploratory study

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dc.contributor.advisor Showden, CR en
dc.contributor.author Ting, David en
dc.date.accessioned 2019-01-07T03:26:37Z en
dc.date.issued 2018 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/45057 en
dc.description Full Text is available to authenticated members of The University of Auckland only. en
dc.description.abstract In 2003, New Zealand became the first country in the world to decriminalise sex work when the Prostitution Reform Act (PRA) was enacted. However, it is not widely known that New Zealand’s model of decriminalization is limited by Section 19 of the PRA, which prohibits sex work by migrants who hold temporary visas, who may be deported for providing commercial sexual services. Section 19 aims to prevent trafficking, yet no cases of this crime have ever been officially identified in New Zealand’s sex industry, while an absence of rights and protections renders migrant sex workers particularly vulnerable to violence and exploitation. To address a gap in research on this topic, this thesis compares the dominant discourse around trafficking into sex work with the lived realities of migrant Asian sex workers in Auckland, who make up a significant proportion of all migrant sex workers in New Zealand. The thesis begins with a chapter on New Zealand’s anti-trafficking policy and practice in regards to migrant sex workers, before moving on to a chapter that reviews the history of -and literature about –this population. The next chapter focuses on the methods used to recruit a diverse sample of 20 migrant Asian sex workers who participated in semi-structured interviews. The following chapter documents the themes that were reported by participants, including their varied motivations for migration and sex work; their shifting working conditions within the managed, private, and street-based sectors of Auckland’s sex industry; and their nuanced perceptions of this labour. Overall, the complex realities of research participants neither fully support nor fully contradict the dominant discourse around trafficking, but they highlight a need to repeal Section 19 of the PRA so that migrant sex workers are less vulnerable to violence and exploitation. en
dc.publisher ResearchSpace@Auckland en
dc.relation.ispartof Masters Thesis - University of Auckland en
dc.relation.isreferencedby UoA99265117313302091 en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. en
dc.rights Restricted Item. Full Text is available to authenticated members of The University of Auckland only. en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/nz/ en
dc.title Understanding the experiences of migrant Asian sex workers in New Zealand: An exploratory study en
dc.type Thesis en
thesis.degree.discipline Sociology en
thesis.degree.grantor The University of Auckland en
thesis.degree.level Masters en
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The author en
pubs.elements-id 759083 en
pubs.record-created-at-source-date 2019-01-07 en


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