Reducing Disgust-based Avoidance in Physical Health: An experimental study investigating the role of exposure and reappraisal

ResearchSpace/Manakin Repository

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Consedine, N en
dc.contributor.author Myr, Nicole Elizabeth en
dc.date.accessioned 2019-02-20T02:39:47Z en
dc.date.issued 2018 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/45201 en
dc.description Full Text is available to authenticated members of The University of Auckland only en
dc.description.abstract Despite it often being detrimental to health, delays and avoidance are common in health care. Delays and avoidance not only contribute to increased morbidity and mortality for the individual but, in contexts such as sexual health, can also lead to the ongoing transmission of infections to others increasing the burden of disease in society more broadly. Research into the factors predicting delay and avoidance remains ongoing. Evidence for the interventional utility of the factors most widely studied (e.g., structural/provider, demographic, and cognitive factors) are lacking. In line with other studies, the current thesis examines emotions as a possible cause of avoidance in health care. In the functional-evolutionary view, emotions evolved over time because they enhance fitness and survival. While there are several emotions that broadly evolved to motivate avoidance (e.g., fear, embarrassment, shame), disgust has been less systematically studied despite having specifically evolved to promote avoidance in the context of physical health. From symptoms, to medical investigations and treatment, disgust and its elicitors are widely present in physical health contexts creating a prima facie case for disgust's involvement. Early work has linked disgust to greater avoidance in health, but studies have yet to test how we might seek to reduce disgust-based avoidance. Work in mental health contexts has tested exposure as a possible strategy, although evidence is mixed, and other approaches are needed. Studies in basic emotion regulation research suggest reappraisal is generally effective in reducing negative emotions although neither strategy has been investigated in physical health contexts. The experimental study presented in this thesis is the first to evaluate whether reappraisal and/or exposure can reduce self-reported disgust and/or behavioural avoidance for the two types of disgust elicitor most common in health - pathogen and sexual disgust. Secondary questions regarding the possible moderators of interventional efficacy, namely, trait disgust and resting heart rate variability (HRV) were also examined. en
dc.publisher ResearchSpace@Auckland en
dc.relation.ispartof Masters Thesis - University of Auckland en
dc.relation.isreferencedby UoA99265116113902091 en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. en
dc.rights Restricted Item. Full Text is available to authenticated members of The University of Auckland only. en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/nz/ en
dc.title Reducing Disgust-based Avoidance in Physical Health: An experimental study investigating the role of exposure and reappraisal en
dc.type Thesis en
thesis.degree.discipline Health Psychology en
thesis.degree.grantor The University of Auckland en
thesis.degree.level Masters en
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The author en
pubs.elements-id 763143 en
pubs.org-id Science en
pubs.org-id Psychology en
pubs.record-created-at-source-date 2019-02-20 en


Full text options

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/nz/ Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/nz/

Share

Search ResearchSpace


Advanced Search

Browse