A fantastic subversion, a fantastic retelling: The reinterpretation of folk narrative elements and motifs in J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban

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dc.contributor.advisor Marquis, C en
dc.contributor.author Rayan, Shreta en
dc.date.accessioned 2019-02-27T22:00:56Z en
dc.date.issued 2019 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/45591 en
dc.description Full Text is available to authenticated members of The University of Auckland only. en
dc.description.abstract Fantasy has always been a subversive and intertextual genre, contrary to what its critics have claimed. The purpose of this thesis is to show that fantasy, as entertaining as it is, is also capable of providing critical commentaries on the real world. In doing so, I will look at how fantasy fiction borrows motifs and structure from folk narratives and merges them with the concerns of the real world. In order to give a sense of structure, I have divided this thesis into two parts : Part I (Chapters Two and Three), and Part II (Chapters Four to Six). Part I will focus on outlining and defining the key theoretical frameworks that I will be employing throughout my thesis. In Chapter Two, I will elaborate on the various creativity and intertextuality studies devised by David Eagleman, Anthony Brandt, Julie Sanders, and Mikhail Bakhtin. In addition to this, I will also look at the fantasy theories offered by Brian Attebery and J.R.R Tolkien. I ultimately aim to show in this chapter that fantasy fiction, rather than being a formulaic genre, is capable of variation and hybridity. In Chapter Three, I will delineate the differences between the three branches of folk narratives, and show how they influence the real world by using specific case studies. In Part II, I will apply my theoretical frameworks to my chosen text, J.K. Rowling’s children’s book, Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (1993). In Chapter Four, I will examine how Rowling embeds the Proppian folktale narrative structure to signal Harry’s journey towards the truth about the Wizarding World and its inadequacies. Chapter Five will outline how Rowling reinterprets folk narrative representations of time-space unity (chronotopes) to open up conversations about change and society. In Chapter Six, I will explore how Rowling alters and complicates the folk narrative notions of heroism and villainy in her book. en
dc.publisher ResearchSpace@Auckland en
dc.relation.ispartof Masters Thesis - University of Auckland en
dc.relation.isreferencedby UoA99265150803602091 en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. en
dc.rights Restricted Item. Full Text is available to authenticated members of The University of Auckland only. en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/nz/ en
dc.title A fantastic subversion, a fantastic retelling: The reinterpretation of folk narrative elements and motifs in J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban en
dc.type Thesis en
thesis.degree.discipline English en
thesis.degree.grantor The University of Auckland en
thesis.degree.level Masters en
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The author en
pubs.elements-id 764215 en
pubs.org-id Medical and Health Sciences en
pubs.org-id Faculty Administration FMHS en
pubs.org-id Group Services en
pubs.record-created-at-source-date 2019-02-28 en


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