Secular trends 2013–2017 in overweight and visible dental decay in New Zealand preschool children: influence of ethnicity, deprivation and the Under-5-Energize nutrition and physical activity programme

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dc.contributor.author Rush, E en
dc.contributor.author Kirk, M en
dc.contributor.author Parmar, P en
dc.contributor.author Young, Leanne en
dc.contributor.author Obolonkin, V en
dc.date.accessioned 2019-03-01T02:56:38Z en
dc.date.issued 2019-06 en
dc.identifier.issn 2040-1752 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/45661 en
dc.description.abstract Early-life intervention to reduce obesity and poor dental health through early-life nutrition will improve health outcomes in later life. This study examined the prevalence of overweight and obesity and visual dental decay in 4-year old children in New Zealand between 2013 and 2017, and the impact of a nutrition and physical activity intervention programme, Under-5-Energize (U5E), on prevalence of these conditions within ethnic groups and by deprivation. The data set included 277,963 4-year-old children, including 25,140 from the Waikato region children of whom 8067 attended one of the 121 early childhood centres (ECC) receiving the U5E programme from 2014. Purposively the U5E-ECC selected were attended by higher proportions of indigenous Māori children and children living in higher deprivation areas than non-U5E-ECC. From 2013 to 2017, the overall prevalence of obesity, as defined by World Health Organisation criteria, declined slightly but rates of dental decay did not change. In the Waikato region, the prevalence of obesity declined in non-Māori children from 2015 to 2017 and children attending U5E-ECC had lower rates of dental decay than non-U5E children. Binary logistic regression showed that between 2015 and 2017 visible dental decay was more likely in children who were Māori (3.06×3.17), living in high deprivation (1.54×1.66) and male (1.10) but less likely if attending an U5E-ECC (0.83×0.79). Early-life intervention had efficacy at reducing dental decay, and demonstrated that the origins of disparities in health such as ethnicity and deprivation need to be addressed further to break the intergenerational cycles of poor health. en
dc.publisher Cambridge University Press (CUP) en
dc.relation.ispartofseries Journal of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.title Secular trends 2013–2017 in overweight and visible dental decay in New Zealand preschool children: influence of ethnicity, deprivation and the Under-5-Energize nutrition and physical activity programme en
dc.type Journal Article en
dc.identifier.doi 10.1017/S2040174418000788 en
pubs.issue 3 en
pubs.begin-page 345 en
pubs.volume 10 en
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The author en
pubs.end-page 352 en
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/RestrictedAccess en
pubs.subtype Article en
pubs.elements-id 757394 en
pubs.org-id Medical and Health Sciences en
pubs.org-id Population Health en
pubs.org-id Pacific Health en
pubs.record-created-at-source-date 2018-12-04 en
pubs.online-publication-date 2018-10-31 en


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