Sweetening the Pregnancy Period: Investigating the metabolic impact of fructose and artificial sweetener intake during pregnancy

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dc.contributor.advisor Reynolds, C en
dc.contributor.author Morton-Jones, Jacob en
dc.date.accessioned 2019-03-04T02:25:54Z en
dc.date.issued 2018 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/45706 en
dc.description Full Text is available to authenticated members of The University of Auckland only. en
dc.description.abstract Sugar-sweetened foods and beverages are associated with adverse effects on metabolic health and have been implicated in the global obesity epidemic. Current guidelines encourage women to avoid consuming sugar during pregnancy, often leading to increased artificially sweetened food and beverage choices. These have been linked to increased gut glucose absorption, promoting hyperglycaemia. We hypothesised that sugar and artificial sweetener consumption during pregnancy could impair maternal offspring metabolic function. Pregnant C57BL/6 mice received either water (CD), artificial sweetener (AS; 12.5mmol/L acesulfame-potassium) or high fructose corn syrup (Fr; 10% solution of high fructose corn syrup) from gestational day (GD) 0.5 (n=12/group). All groups received an ad libitum diet of standard chow. Maternal weight, food and liquid intake was recorded throughout gestation. Offspring were weighed daily until weaning at day 21. Upon weaning, offspring numbers were reduced and housed in groups of three same sex sibling. An oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed on mothers at GD16.5 and mice were culled at GD18.5. Offspring were culled at 16 weeks of age. Fetal fasting truncal blood glucose was taken on GD 18.5 fetuses. Data were analysed by repeated measures or one-way ANOVA, as appropriate. Maternal caloric intake, weight and fat mass did not differ between groups. At cull, maternal AS and Fr groups had increased fasting glucose and impaired glucose intolerance compared to the CD group. Fasting insulin and leptin concentrations were increased in the Fr, but not AS group, when compared to CD. AS reduced male fetal weight and female fetal fasting blood glucose compared with CD. However, there were no observed differences between the adult offspring groups. Fr and AS consumption were associated with maternal metabolic dysfunction. AS was associated with reduced fetal growth and hypoglycaemia and may not be a beneficial alternative for sugary foods during pregnancy. en
dc.publisher ResearchSpace@Auckland en
dc.relation.ispartof Masters Thesis - University of Auckland en
dc.relation.isreferencedby UoA99265150802202091 en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. en
dc.rights Restricted Item. Full Text is available to authenticated members of The University of Auckland only. en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/nz/ en
dc.title Sweetening the Pregnancy Period: Investigating the metabolic impact of fructose and artificial sweetener intake during pregnancy en
dc.type Thesis en
thesis.degree.discipline Nutrition and Dietetics en
thesis.degree.grantor The University of Auckland en
thesis.degree.level Masters en
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The author en
pubs.elements-id 765451 en
pubs.record-created-at-source-date 2019-03-04 en


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http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/nz/ Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/nz/

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