Why choose between “train-and-place” or “place-and-train” when you can do both? Does simulated-setting training enhance job-site training for individuals with intellectual disabilities?

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dc.contributor.advisor Phillips, K en
dc.contributor.author Holtzhausen, Michelle en
dc.date.accessioned 2019-04-04T00:21:08Z en
dc.date.issued 2018 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/46355 en
dc.description.abstract Three individuals with intellectual disabilities were trained in job tasks in three different settings. The training settings were (1) job-site alone; (2) simulated-setting alone; and (3) a combination of job-site and simulated setting. A multiple-probe design across job tasks and participants was used to assess the effects of the different training settings on their independent performance of the job tasks. The goal of the study was to identify the training setting that is most efficient and effective for training individuals with intellectual disabilities in job tasks. The results revealed that for two of the participants, combined settings training was almost as efficient as job-site training, and even more effective than job-site training in terms of generalisation and maintenance. This suggests that combined-setting training is a viable alternative to enhance job-site training for individuals with intellectual disabilities. Directions for future research include enhancing simulated-setting training with electronic devices, and transferring the job training for delivery by co-workers. en
dc.publisher ResearchSpace@Auckland en
dc.relation.ispartof Masters Thesis - University of Auckland en
dc.relation.isreferencedby UoA99265159113702091 en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.title Why choose between “train-and-place” or “place-and-train” when you can do both? Does simulated-setting training enhance job-site training for individuals with intellectual disabilities? en
dc.type Thesis en
thesis.degree.discipline Psychology en
thesis.degree.grantor The University of Auckland en
thesis.degree.level Masters en
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The author en
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/OpenAccess en
pubs.elements-id 767805 en
pubs.record-created-at-source-date 2019-04-04 en


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