Invasive pneumococcal disease and serotype emergence in the Auckland region during the vaccine era 2009-16.

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dc.contributor.author Eichler, Nick en
dc.contributor.author Reynolds, Edwin en
dc.contributor.author Jackson, Catherine en
dc.contributor.author Thornley, Simon en
dc.contributor.author Peters, Julia en
dc.date.accessioned 2019-05-27T03:04:00Z en
dc.date.issued 2019-04 en
dc.identifier.citation Journal of Primary Health Care 11(1):24-31 Apr 2019 en
dc.identifier.issn 1172-6164 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/46570 en
dc.description.abstract INTRODUCTION There is a deficit of knowledge in New Zealand as the epidemiology of invasive pneumococcal disease varies significantly between countries. AIM Time trends and sociodemographic characteristics of cases of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in the Auckland region are reviewed after the introduction of a conjugate vaccination, to provide evidence for future vaccine policy and to ensure Auckland region analysis is representative of national trends for subsequent IPD analysis. METHODS Data on all cases of IPD occurring in Waitemata, Auckland and Counties Manukau District Health Boards between 2009 and 2016 were extracted from EpiSurv. Denominator data were drawn from mid-year estimates supplied by Statistics New Zealand. Descriptive epidemiology and time-series regression was performed to analyse trends. RESULTS Rates of IPD have fallen in the Auckland region over the past 8 years by 32%. While absolute rates in the elderly have reduced by 12%, they have the highest disease burden at 32/100,000. The ethnic disparity continues with Pacific people (33/100,000) and Māori (14/100,000) over represented compared to European (10/100,000). In the elderly, the 19A serotype has increased from an incidence of 0 in 2008 to 8.2/100,000. DISCUSSION Large ethnic and age-related disparities are observed in the Auckland region, consistent with the rest of the country, since the start of the pneumococcal vaccination era. Extending immunisation to the elderly may help close these gaps. As with other countries, there is 19A serotype replacement occurring following conjugate vaccine introduction. en
dc.format.medium Print en
dc.language eng en
dc.relation.ispartofseries Journal of primary health care en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.rights.uri http://www.publish.csiro.au/hc/forauthors/openaccess en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.title Invasive pneumococcal disease and serotype emergence in the Auckland region during the vaccine era 2009-16. en
dc.type Journal Article en
dc.identifier.doi 10.1071/hc17080 en
pubs.issue 1 en
pubs.begin-page 24 en
pubs.volume 11 en
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The authors en
pubs.end-page 31 en
pubs.publication-status Published en
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/OpenAccess en
pubs.subtype Journal Article en
pubs.elements-id 769105 en
pubs.org-id Medical and Health Sciences en
pubs.org-id Population Health en
pubs.org-id Epidemiology & Biostatistics en
dc.identifier.eissn 1172-6156 en
pubs.record-created-at-source-date 2019-05-02 en
pubs.dimensions-id 31039986 en


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