A narrative investigation of the influence of cultural identity on the success of high-achieving postgraduate students

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dc.contributor.author Chen, Dawn en
dc.date.accessioned 2019-06-30T20:51:39Z en
dc.date.issued 2019 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/47293 en
dc.description Full Text is available to authenticated members of The University of Auckland only. en
dc.description.abstract Cultural identity has been suggested as a key factor in students' educational success, but how does it influence success? This narrative study investigated the influence of cultural identity on the success of six culturally diverse, high-achieving postgraduate students identifying as Māori, Pākehā and/or Chinese. As a researcher and participant, my own perspective as a critical autoethnographer was also included. Personal narratives pertaining to cultural identity were shared, inclusive of both the potential influence of culture on success, and individual perceptions of success. Themes arising from the findings could not be neatly packaged according to Māori, Pākehā or Chinese cultures, instead, the narratives were highly nuanced and unique to each individual, where participants held overlapping views, irrespective of their cultural self-identification. It was evident cultural identity was a journey, a process of becoming that was context-dependent. Writing as a method of inquiry was utilised as a method of analysis which generated perceptions of duty that emerged in the findings. Findings were analysed through the theoretical ideas of collectivism and individualism, comparing Indigenous and Eastern values to Western, mainstream values. The participants held varied perspectives of success, both traditionally and holistically and also varied perspectives of how their culture influenced their success. Implications arising from the study suggest that educators need to better understand their students, and to build relationships in order to learn what obligations or motives drive them. Diverse views of success should be explored beyond academic achievement. Assumptions cannot be made regarding a person's perceived culture or identity as every individual has diverse backgrounds, experiences and perspectives, which in turn influences success in different ways. en
dc.publisher ResearchSpace@Auckland en
dc.relation.ispartof Masters Thesis - University of Auckland en
dc.relation.isreferencedby UoA99265158714102091 en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. en
dc.rights Restricted Item. Full Text is available to authenticated members of The University of Auckland only. en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/nz/ en
dc.title A narrative investigation of the influence of cultural identity on the success of high-achieving postgraduate students en
dc.type Thesis en
thesis.degree.discipline Education en
thesis.degree.grantor The University of Auckland en
thesis.degree.level Masters en
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The author en
pubs.elements-id 775660 en
pubs.record-created-at-source-date 2019-07-01 en


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http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/nz/ Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/nz/

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