Using respirometry to investigate stress responses in Pagrus auratus exposed to anthropogenic noise

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dc.contributor.advisor Radford, C en
dc.contributor.advisor Herbert, N en
dc.contributor.author Collins, Selwyn en
dc.date.accessioned 2019-08-07T01:20:05Z en
dc.date.issued 2019 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/47462 en
dc.description Full Text is available to authenticated members of The University of Auckland only. en
dc.description.abstract Anthropogenic noise has changed the underwater soundscape of many coastal locations worldwide. This has been linked to several negative effects on marine taxa, from behavioural changes and masking of biologically important sounds, to major barotrauma injuries. Respirometry is increasingly being employed to measure oxygen uptake (MO2) as a proxy for metabolic rates and ultimately as a stress response to anthropogenic noise. This study used automated intermittent-flow respirometry to measure the stress responses of juvenile snapper (Pagrus auratus) exposed to ship and pile driving sounds. The experimental design used two controls, a "no sound" treatment group and "before" treatment within individual measurement. MO2 data alone suggest there is no effect of either anthropogenic sounds on routine metabolic rate (RMR). Taking activity into account resulted in the RMR of pile driving exposed fish to increase, however there was no effect observed on fish exposed to ship sound. These results are different to other studies (Simpson et al., 2015; Simpson et al., 2016; Harding et al., 2018), where it was shown that motorboat noise increases the rate of oxygen consumption. There are a number of potential reasons for this but experimental technique is possibly key. Here, intermittent-flow respirometry gave long recovery times and took many measures of MO2 before and during sound exposure. In contrast, the other studies used short recovery times and a simple 'fish in a bottle' type approach that is limited in the number of oxygen consumption measures and is potentially fraught with fish activity artefacts. While species-specific differences cannot be excluded at present, this work highlights a need for robust, standardised methods to assess the effects of anthropogenic noise on metabolism. en
dc.publisher ResearchSpace@Auckland en
dc.relation.ispartof Masters Thesis - University of Auckland en
dc.relation.isreferencedby UoA99265170612802091 en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. en
dc.rights Restricted Item. Full Text is available to authenticated members of The University of Auckland only. en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/nz/ en
dc.title Using respirometry to investigate stress responses in Pagrus auratus exposed to anthropogenic noise en
dc.type Thesis en
thesis.degree.discipline Marine Science en
thesis.degree.grantor The University of Auckland en
thesis.degree.level Masters en
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The author en
pubs.elements-id 778376 en
pubs.record-created-at-source-date 2019-08-07 en


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http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/nz/ Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/nz/

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