Noise Exposure and Noise Induced Hearing Loss in Musicians

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dc.contributor.advisor Welch, D en
dc.contributor.advisor Reddy, R en
dc.contributor.advisor Kobayashi, K en
dc.contributor.author Patel, Jayradha en
dc.date.accessioned 2019-08-19T03:51:21Z en
dc.date.issued 2019 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/47511 en
dc.description Full Text is available to authenticated members of The University of Auckland only. en
dc.description.abstract Noise induced hearing loss (NIHL) is prevalent amongst musicians and can have a debilitating influence on their musical careers and quality of life. The prevention of NIHL in musicians is challenging because of their need to hear music precisely. The use of earplugs is the most practical protective measure against NIHL. However, reported usage rates are poor. Amongst New Zealand musicians, little is known about their hearing health and use of noise reduction strategies. The aim of this research was to explore hearing loss, earplug use and sound exposure in New Zealand musicians. Methods: A short online questionnaire assessed selfreport measures related to NIHL in 81 musicians. Dosimetry measurement of sound levels was then conducted for seven days with a subset of 6 musicians. Audiometric testing involving measurement of otoacoustic emissions, pure tone audiometry, extended high frequency audiometry and real ear at threshold individual earplug fit testing was then undertaken with these 6 musicians. Findings: The prevalence of self-reported hearing loss was found to be 43.2%. Additionally, 17.7% of musicians always experienced tinnitus and 66.3% of musicians perceived hazardous sound exposure during performances. Reported earplug use was 46.9% and inconsistent across musical situations. Numerous barriers to earplug use were identified. Amongst the 6 musicians, dosimetry measures revealed a substantial risk of NIHL and fit training was demonstrated to improve the earplug attenuation achieved. Conclusion: The high prevalence of hearing issues and widespread difficulties associated with earplug use supports the need for the development of hearing conservation strategies for the musician population in New Zealand. en
dc.publisher ResearchSpace@Auckland en
dc.relation.ispartof Masters Thesis - University of Auckland en
dc.relation.isreferencedby UoA99265183214002091 en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. en
dc.rights Restricted Item. Full Text is available to authenticated members of The University of Auckland only. en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/nz/ en
dc.title Noise Exposure and Noise Induced Hearing Loss in Musicians en
dc.type Thesis en
thesis.degree.discipline Audiology en
thesis.degree.grantor The University of Auckland en
thesis.degree.level Masters en
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The author en
pubs.elements-id 779216 en
pubs.record-created-at-source-date 2019-08-19 en


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