Gestational weight gain in a multi-ethnic sample of pregnant women from Counties Manukau Health, Auckland, New Zealand

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dc.contributor.author Naiqiso, SLS en
dc.contributor.author Christensen, PM en
dc.contributor.author Gafa, Cathryn en
dc.contributor.author McCowan, Lesley en
dc.date.accessioned 2019-10-01T20:52:18Z en
dc.date.issued 2019-06-21 en
dc.identifier.citation New Zealand Medical Journal 132(1497):37-45 21 Jun 2019 en
dc.identifier.issn 0028-8446 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/48280 en
dc.description.abstract AIM:High and low gestational weight gain (GWG) adversely affects perinatal outcomes, and impacts long-term maternal and child health. Our aim is to report i) GWG categories by 2009 Institute of Medicine guidelines in the multi-ethnic population in Counties Manukau Health, ii) demographic factors and iii) adverse perinatal outcomes associated with high and low GWG. METHOD:Women with singleton pregnancy and weight recorded at ≤20 weeks and again in the third trimester comprised the study population. GWG categories (weight gain per week) were defined as low, normal or high. Maternal characteristics and pregnancy outcomes were compared between GWG categories. RESULTS:Study population comprised 604 women: 39.7% Pacific, 19.9% Māori, 21.5% European. 70.5% were overweight or obese, and 65.1% lived in the highest deprivation decile areas. 70.7% had high, 16.1% had normal and 13.2% had low GWG. Pacific [OR 3.58 (95% CI 1.82, 7.03)] had increased odds of high GWG and Para 2/3+ had reduced odds of high GWG [OR 0.50 (95% CI 0.26, 0.99), OR 0.36 (95% CI 0.17, 0.74) respectively]. Low GWG was associated with increased SGA [ OR 2.48 (95% CI 1.11, 6.44)] and with GDM [OR 2.74 (95%CI 1.06, 8.79)]. We demonstrated a linear association between GWG and birthweight with 126g (95% CI: 90g, 162g) increase per 250g increase in weekly GWG. CONCLUSION:The majority of participants had high GWG, which is clinically relevant as this was associated with increased infant weight, with potential to perpetuate intergenerational obesity. The association between low GWG and GDM may reflect care in the GDM clinic. en
dc.format.medium Electronic en
dc.language eng en
dc.publisher New Zealand Medical Association en
dc.relation.ispartofseries New Zealand Medical Journal en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.rights.uri https://www.nzma.org.nz/journal/contribute en
dc.title Gestational weight gain in a multi-ethnic sample of pregnant women from Counties Manukau Health, Auckland, New Zealand en
dc.type Journal Article en
pubs.issue 1497 en
pubs.begin-page 37 en
pubs.volume 132 en
dc.rights.holder Copyright: NZMA en
pubs.author-url https://www.nzma.org.nz/journal/read-the-journal/all-issues/2010-2019/2019/vol-132-no-1497-21-june-2019/7912 en
pubs.end-page 45 en
pubs.publication-status Published en
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/OpenAccess en
pubs.subtype Article en
pubs.elements-id 776244 en
pubs.org-id Medical and Health Sciences en
pubs.org-id School of Medicine en
pubs.org-id Obstetrics and Gynaecology en
dc.identifier.eissn 1175-8716 en
pubs.record-created-at-source-date 2019-10-10 en
pubs.dimensions-id 31220064 en


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