Real-Time Measurement of Melanoma Cell-Mediated Human Brain Endothelial Barrier Disruption Using Electric Cell-Substrate Impedance Sensing Technology.

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dc.contributor.author Anchan, Akshata en
dc.contributor.author Kalogirou-Baldwin, Panagiota en
dc.contributor.author Johnson, Rebecca en
dc.contributor.author Kho, Dan en
dc.contributor.author Joseph, Wayne en
dc.contributor.author Hucklesby, James en
dc.contributor.author Finlay, Graeme en
dc.contributor.author OCarroll, Simon en
dc.contributor.author Angel, Catherine en
dc.contributor.author Graham, Euan en
dc.date.accessioned 2019-10-02T00:46:33Z en
dc.date.issued 2019-04-15 en
dc.identifier.citation Biosensors 9(2) 15 Apr 2019 en
dc.identifier.issn 2079-6374 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/48337 en
dc.description.abstract Electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) is an impedance-based method for monitoring changes in cell behaviour in real-time. In this paper, we highlight the importance of ECIS in measuring the kinetics of human melanoma cell invasion across human brain endothelium. ECIS data can be mathematically modelled to assess which component of the endothelial paracellular and basolateral barriers is being affected and when. Our results reveal that a range of human melanoma cells can mediate disruption of human brain endothelium, primarily involving the paracellular route, as demonstrated by ECIS. The sensitivity of ECIS also reveals that the paracellular barrier weakens within 30-60 min of the melanoma cells being added to the apical face of the endothelial cells. Imaging reveals pronounced localisation of the melanoma cells at the paracellular junctions consistent with paracellular migration. Time-lapse imaging further reveals junctional opening and disruption of the endothelial monolayer by the invasive melanoma cells all within several hours. We suggest that the ability of ECIS to resolve changes to barrier integrity in real time, and to determine the route of migration, provides a powerful tool for future studies investigating the key molecules involved in the invasive process of cancer cells. en
dc.format.medium Electronic en
dc.language eng en
dc.relation.ispartofseries Biosensors en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.subject Blood-Brain Barrier en
dc.subject Brain en
dc.subject Endothelial Cells en
dc.subject Humans en
dc.subject Melanoma en
dc.subject Skin Neoplasms en
dc.subject Biosensing Techniques en
dc.subject Electric Impedance en
dc.subject Time Factors en
dc.title Real-Time Measurement of Melanoma Cell-Mediated Human Brain Endothelial Barrier Disruption Using Electric Cell-Substrate Impedance Sensing Technology. en
dc.type Journal Article en
dc.identifier.doi 10.3390/bios9020056 en
pubs.issue 2 en
pubs.volume 9 en
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The authors en
pubs.publication-status Published en
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/OpenAccess en
pubs.subtype research-article en
pubs.subtype Journal Article en
pubs.elements-id 769164 en
pubs.org-id Medical and Health Sciences en
pubs.org-id Medical Sciences en
pubs.org-id Anatomy and Medical Imaging en
pubs.org-id Auckland Cancer Research en
pubs.org-id Molecular Medicine en
pubs.org-id Pharmacology en
pubs.org-id Science en
pubs.org-id Biological Sciences en
dc.identifier.eissn 2079-6374 en
pubs.record-created-at-source-date 2019-04-18 en
pubs.dimensions-id 30991758 en


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