The Drone of Drones: A Preliminary Investigation of Drone Noise and Animal Welfare in New Zealand Sheep

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dc.contributor.advisor Jullig, MC en
dc.contributor.author Krishnamoorthy, Vetrivhel en
dc.date.accessioned 2019-10-14T00:24:14Z en
dc.date.issued 2019 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/48530 en
dc.description Full Text is available to authenticated members of The University of Auckland only. en
dc.description.abstract The use of drone technology on farms is a critically under-researched area of animal welfare, particularly as their use has become increasingly common and accessible to New Zealand sheep farmers. Drone technology is loud, and the welfare implications of the noise and noise reduction technology is unknown with few studies to inform both regulation and the future development of the technology. In this study I investigated the effect of dampening drone noise on the stress and habituation of domestic sheep. Due to resource constraints, this study was unable to directly address all the gaps in the literature. Instead, the preliminary investigation aimed to pave the way for future research, by establishing a study method, identifying likely pitfalls and investigating the effect of noise dampening technology on sheep and their welfare. In the absence of prior research, this was done using an initial pre-trial investigation of 6 sheep to confirm the safety of the method, followed by full trials with three different study groups. The two subsequent full trials used 18 sheep each, allocating 6 to a control group, 'quiet' drone exposure group, or 'loud' drone exposure group. Mavic pro 2 drones were used for flyover treatments. The 'quiet' drone was equipped with Dotterels proprietary acoustic nanofiber shroud. The 'loud' drone was initially equipped with commercially available propeller cages, which were replaced by commercially available propeller guards after they were irreparably damaged. Sheep, as cognitively capable mammals, have stress factors that are both physiological and psychological. This necessitated the concurrent investigation of both heartrate data (n=4) measured byPolarH10 chest strap monitors, as well as behavioural analysis (n=6) provided by an animal behaviour expert. The investigation was unable to conclusively identify statistically valid physiological trends, but through behavioural analysis found that the acoustic shroud substantially reduced animal stress and habituation time when compared to the louder drone. Whilst this study was incapable of directly addressing the needs for regulation and drone design innovation; recommendations for future research were made. en
dc.publisher ResearchSpace@Auckland en
dc.relation.ispartof Masters Thesis - University of Auckland en
dc.relation.isreferencedby UoA99265184010902091 en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. en
dc.rights Restricted Item. Full Text is available to authenticated members of The University of Auckland only. en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/nz/ en
dc.title The Drone of Drones: A Preliminary Investigation of Drone Noise and Animal Welfare in New Zealand Sheep en
dc.type Thesis en
thesis.degree.discipline BioScience Enterprise en
thesis.degree.grantor The University of Auckland en
thesis.degree.level Masters en
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The author en
pubs.elements-id 784076 en
pubs.record-created-at-source-date 2019-10-14 en


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http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/nz/ Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/nz/

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